express

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by ankle express

By walking (to a certain location). My car's in the shop, so we'll have to go to the store by ankle express. It'll take us forever to get there by ankle express! Can't you give us a ride?
See also: ankle, by, express

express (one's) anger

To release or share one's anger in some way. I express a lot of my anger in therapy. He never expressed his anger to me, so I had no idea he was so unhappy.
See also: anger, express

express (oneself)

To share one's thoughts or feelings in a particular way, often through art. I use art therapy as a way to get children to express themselves.
See also: express

express (oneself) to (someone) on (someone or something)

To share one's thoughts on someone or something. Well, did you express yourself to David on that problem? He's not a mind-reader, you know. I never expressed myself to anyone on Laura—how did they know I have a crush on her?
See also: express, on

in round numbers

In or as a rounded, approximate number. And what do you think an expansion on the house like that would set us back, in round numbers at least? In round numbers, childcare is going to cost us about $2,000 a month.
See also: number, round

Siberian Express

An extremely cold air mass that originates in Siberia and travels to another country, especially the United States. A play on the name of the rail line. Primarily heard in US. We've been having an unusually warm November, but the temperature is expected to plummet next week once the Siberian Express hits. The entire region has been blasted with cold air by the Siberian Express, with temperatures dipping as low as -10 degrees Fahrenheit.
See also: express

by ankle express

Fig. on foot. After my horse was stolen, I had to go by ankle express. It's a five-minute drive, forty minutes by ankle express.
See also: ankle, by, express

express one's anger

to allow a release or expression of anger, such as through angry words, violence, or talking out a problem. Don't keep your emotions inside of you. You have to learn to express your anger. Bob expresses his anger by yelling at people.
See also: anger, express

express (oneself) to someone on something

to say what one thinks about something. I will express myself to Karen on that matter at another time. She expressed herself on Karen to the entire group.
See also: express, on

*in round numbers

 and *in round figures
Fig. as an estimated number; a figure that has been rounded off. (*Typically: be ~; express something ~; write something ~.) Please tell me in round numbers what it'll cost. I don't need the exact amount. Just give it to me in round figures.
See also: number, round

express oneself

Reveal or portray one's feelings or views through speech, writing, some form of art, or behavior. For example, I find it hard to express myself in Italian, or Helen expresses herself through her painting, or Teenagers often express themselves through their attire, haircuts, and the like. [Mid-1500s]
See also: express

in round numbers

Also, in round figures. As an approximate estimate. For example, How much will the new highway cost, in round numbers? or In round figures a diamond of this quality is worth five thousand dollars, but it depends on the market at the time of selling . This idiom, which uses round in the sense of "whole" or "rounded off," is sometimes used very loosely, as Thomas Hardy did in Far from the Madding Crowd (1874): "Well, ma'am, in round numbers, she's run away with the soldiers." [Mid-1600s] Also see ballpark figure.
See also: number, round

Siberian express

n. an enormous mass of very cold air moving from Siberia, across the North Pole, and down onto North America. The country braced itself for a return Friday of the Siberian express with temperatures dropping to twenty below in many areas.
See also: express
References in periodicals archive ?
Many expressed frustration at the lack of available time to plan, prepare, and evaluate.
Interestingly, the counselors themselves expressed difficulty relinquishing nonguidance responsibilities that were once defined, often by administrators, as part of their domain.
The main concern expressed by counselors in the current study was the time required to adequately and effectively implement the program.
Family caregivers from non-PACE cities expressed a great deal of concern over how they would deal with changes in their loved one's health status.
Focus group participants expressed confidence that the PACE program would present options to them, no matter how the healthcare needs of their family members changed.
Earlier cell-culture studies by Reba Goodman of Columbia University's Health Sciences Center and Ann Henderson at Hunter College revealed an ELF-related increase in the DNA transcription rates of normally expressed genes in human white blood cells and in salivary-gland cells from fruit flies, Goodman says.
In their latest study -- which Goodman described last week in Washington, D.C., at a meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology -- the team focused on the transcription rates of five genes normally expressed in a human leukemia cell line.
Goodman says the five ELF-exposed, normally expressed genes showed a 100 to 400 percent increase in transcription rates compared with the unexposed genes.
Several studies in England and the United States have shown a worsening of symptoms and more rehospitalizations among schizophrenics released to families high in expressed emotion.
In addition, subjects randomly assigned to 5 milligrams of injectable fluphenazine decanoate every two weeks do as well overall as those given the standard 25-mg dose, regardless of their family levels of expressed emotion.