expound

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expound (up)on (someone or something)

To talk about or explain someone or something in detail. Please expound on Claire to me because I can't understand some of the wacky things she's done. I had to expound upon my thesis proposal, but the professor did eventually approve my topic.
See also: expound

expound (up)on (someone or something) to (someone or something)

To talk about or explain someone or something in detail. Please expound on Claire to me because I can't understand some of the wacky things she's done. I had to expound upon my thesis proposal, but the professor did eventually approve my topic.
See also: expound

expound

((up)on someone or something) (to someone) to speak at length about someone or something to someone. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) Let me expound upon Tom to you for a while. I think you need all the details on his qualifications. Please do not expound on Bill anymore.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like Paul, Dunbar suffered as the chosen expounder of his own gospel, the African American literary tradition.
Burke appears to have perennial relevance as an expounder of the American Constitution, even though, of course, he never actually engaged in such exposition himself.
We cannot be freed of its obligations by senate or people, and we need not look outside ourselves for an expounder or interpreter of it.
It strives to show that sound reasoning and logic and a more critical understanding of the very processes of creation themselves point to the Divine and uphold the truth of revelation as the ultimate expounder on the secrets and finality of creation.
a political thinker--"far more a gadfly than an expounder of a
The roles of Simeon ben Azzai and Simeon ben Zoma are less clear, however, in that they are evaluated positively elsewhere in Rabbinical literature, which describes them as the most "diligent student" and the greatest "expounder" of Torah, respectively (mSotah 9:15).
Harold Tudor remained vice president of the Eisteddfod and an expounder of its ethos of promoting peace among nations through music and dance.
AMAZINGLY, although Steve Roman, founder and main expounder of modern dosage theory, has been writing about the subject for 20 years, only now has he published a book on it.
James Wilson could call Locke, "one of the most able, most sincere, and most amiable assertors of Christianity and true philosophy."21 And in the understanding of the founders, those two attributes were connected: The founders could preserve their confidence that Locke was the expounder of a "true philosophy" precisely because they saw nothing in his teaching that was incompatible with the foundations of Christianity.n
Although she was known for her sophistication and long cigarette holder, she held a conservative disposition, and was said to be too retiring, precise and scholarly to be an exciting expounder of the new and innovative generalities that were then being developed at Cambridge (Robinson 1978, p.
(109) Or to put it in the language of another, more modern expounder of St.
His main job, he said after retiring, had been as an expounder of Keynes: "Indeed my entire role as an economist has been primarily that of an educator, an expounder, not an inventor." (6) If his record as a creative economic theorist was limited--and there are those who view it much more favorably than that--Hansen's achievement as an explicator and educator was of the highest order, and only someone with huge energy, drive, creativity, and intelligence could have accomplished it.
In the film, Campion inverts the process of myth interpretation; she is anthropologist as expounder of myth and the creator of allegorical figures, not ethnographic case histories.
Deconstruction, New Historicism and pragmatism each claim a relevance that extends to the past as well as the present; Derrida has deconstructed Plato, New Historicism is perhaps best-known for its analyses of the European Renaissance, and Richard Rorty, the leading expounder of the New Pragmatism, gained fame with a history of Wes tern philosophy from Descartes to the present.
In Deformed Discourse Professor Williams argues that, in the Middle Ages, the quality of 'monstrousness' reflected an important philosophical strand - the Neoplatonism which descended through Pseudo-Dionysius and his expounder, John Scotus Eriugena, to influence the whole of the mystical tradition.