expectation

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come up to (one's) expectations

To be as good as or have the qualities that someone predicted, expected, or hoped for. We'd heard so many good things about the new restaurant, but the food didn't come up to our expectations at all, so we were rather disappointed. I'm so excited for the movie in the series—I hope it comes up to my expectations!
See also: come, expectation, up

fire (one) with (an emotion)

To cause one to feel a particular emotion. Overhearing Tim's nasty comments about me fired me with anger. I was having a rough day until thoughts of our upcoming beach vacation fired me with joy.
See also: fire

live up to (someone's) expectations

To be as good as or have the qualities that someone predicted, expected, or hoped for. We'd heard so many good things about the new restaurant, but the food didn't live up to our expectations at all. I'm so excited for the latest movie in the series—I hope it lives up to my expectations!
See also: expectation, live, up

meet (one's)/the requirements

To completely fulfil or satisfy the conditions required for something. Unfortunately, you did not meet the requirements we laid out for you, so your application was rejected. We only use ingredients that meet our very strict requirements for quality and renewability.
See also: meet, requirement

meet (someone's) expectations

To be as good as or have the qualities that someone predicted, expected, or hoped for. We'd heard so many good things about the new restaurant, but the food didn't meet our expectations at all. I'm so excited for the latest movie in the series—I hope it meets my expectations!
See also: expectation, meet

come up to someone's expectations

to be as good as someone expected. Sorry, but this product does not come up to my expectations and I want to return it.
See also: come, expectation, up

fire someone with anger

 and fire someone with enthusiasm; fire someone with hope; fire someone with expectations
Fig. [for someone's words] to fill someone with eagerness or the desire to do something. The speech fired the audience with enthusiasm for change. We were fired with anger to protest against the government.
See also: anger, fire
References in periodicals archive ?
The unbiased nature of a forecast series can be empirically verified based on the unbiasedness test proposed by Theil (1966) by regressing the survey expectational series on the respective realizations according to the realizations-forecast regression (RFR) equation below:
The rational expectational equilibrium ([bar.a], [bar.b], [bar.c]) is E-stable or learnable if all real parts of the eigenvalues of [DT.sub.a], [DT.sub.b] and [DT.sub.c] are lower than 1.
(220) Put simply, the Court has invoked the expectations of ownership to define the limits of legal change but has not resolved how this expectational baseline should be evaluated, largely eschewing thoughtful reflection on the challenges inherent in the feedback loop represented by the circularity problem.
In response to the theoretical models, several empirical studies were undertaken to test the expectational view.
In every period, expectations may be revised on the basis of new information and past expectational errors.
A bit of rearranging transforms the linearized Euler equation (A1.10) into the first-order expectational stochastic difference equation
This is the standard durable-goods result, viz., by renting units the firm can avoid any type expectational problems due to selling and, consequently earns higher profits.
It was the result of self-fulfilling expectational trader behaviour where everyone tries to buy before prices go any higher, forcing prices higher, in a self-perpetuating process.
The leading and most influential writer on this subject, Karl Wiig, defined the different forms of knowledge as factual (that found in books and data), conceptual (found in perspectives and concepts), expectational (knowledge to make judgments and hypothesis), and methodological (knowledge from reasoning and strategies).
Sethi (1979) warns that increasing societal expectational gaps will cause business to lose its legitimacy and will threaten its survival.
Our working hypothesis is that APR is associated with credit risk measures, holding other socioeconomic, demographic, and expectational and motivational characteristics constant:
If investment is not constrained by finance, the error term in the estimated investment equation should reflect pure expectational error and (under the assumption of rational expectations) should be uncorrelated with observed information from the previous period.
A number of other inherently subjective expectational and other outcomes should be of interest to economists, as the extent of rationality in their revision is important.
Many have turned to expectational arguments, claiming that Roosevelt ushered in a "policy regime" that increased consumer and investor confidence.