existence

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bane of (one's) existence

The source or cause of one's misfortune, unhappiness, frustration, or anxiety, usually used hyperbolically. I swear, this project is the bane of my existence. I've been working on it for months and still haven't made any real progress! Jane has been constantly annoying me all week. She's been the bane of my very existence!
See also: bane, existence, of

charmed existence

A life characterized or seemingly protected by marked good fortune or luck, without (or rarely) encountering trouble, danger, or misfortune. Often preceded by the verbs "lead," "live," or "have." Celebrities seem to have a rather charmed existence, with everything handed to them on a silver platter. Other than minor colds, I've never been ill in my life. I guess I've just led a charmed existence.
See also: charmed, existence

come into existence

To appear or arise; to begin to exist. This company only came into existence through the hard work of my talented staff. The newly captured images are helping scientists to understand how some stars come into existence.
See also: come, existence

have a charmed existence

To lead a life characterized or seemingly protected by marked good fortune or luck, without (or rarely) encountering trouble, danger, or misfortune. Celebrities seem to have a rather charmed existence, with everything handed to them on a silver platter. Other than minor colds, I've never been ill in my life. I guess I've just had a charmed existence.
See also: charmed, existence, have

in existence

1. Currently existing. This type of bird won't be in existence for much longer if people keep hunting it for sport.
2. Currently functioning or operating. Man, that is the worst coffee shop in existence—I've almost spat out their lattes before!
3. Having been created or having taken effect. How long has the review panel been in existence? That law wasn't in existence back when I was a cop.
See also: existence

lead a charmed existence

To lead a life characterized or seemingly protected by marked good fortune or luck, without (or rarely) encountering trouble, danger, or misfortune. Celebrities seem to lead a rather charmed existence, with everything handed to them on a silver platter. Other than minor colds, I've never been ill in my life. I guess I've just led a charmed existence.
See also: charmed, existence, lead

live a charmed existence

To lead a life characterized or seemingly protected by marked good fortune or luck, without (or rarely) encountering trouble, danger, or misfortune. Celebrities seem to live a rather charmed existence, with everything handed to them on a silver platter. Other than minor colds, I've never been ill in my life. I guess I've just lived a charmed existence.
See also: charmed, existence, live

wink out

1. Of a flame or light, to become suddenly extinguished. The flashlight sputtered and winked out, leaving us stuck in the cave with no source of light. I sat dreamily watching each candle wink out in the early hours of the morning.
2. To be abruptly killed, destroyed, or ruined. Typically used in passive constructions and often followed by "of existence." I was there on the ground, watching as innocent men, women, and children were winked out of existence by the enemy gunfire. Entire towns were simply winked out as drought and famine swept through the region.
See also: out, wink
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

come into existence

to begin existence; to begin to be. This country came into existence in the early part of the fifteenth century. When did this little town come into existence?
See also: come, existence

in existence

now existing; currently and actually being. The tiger may not be in existence in a few decades. All the oil in existence will not last the world for another century.
See also: existence
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

the bane of somebody’s ˈlife/eˈxistence

a person or thing that makes somebody’s life unpleasant or unhappy: That car is always breaking down! It’s the bane of my life. OPPOSITE: a ray of sunshine
See also: bane, existence, life, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wink out

v.
To become quickly extinguished, especially following a weak burst of activity: The candle flickered and winked out. The street lamps winked out one by one.
See also: out, wink
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bane of one's existence, the

The agent of one’s ruin or misery; a thorn in the flesh. The earliest meaning of the noun bane was “murderer” and was so used in Beowulf (ca. a.d. 800). A somewhat later meaning was “poison,” which survives as part of the names of various poisonous plants, such as henbane or wolf’s bane. The current sense, an agent of ruin, dates from the late 1500s. Today it is almost always used hyperbolically, as in “The new secretary loses all my messages; she’s become the bane of my existence.”
See also: bane, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
I also claim that existence is not single but fivefold: real, phenomenal, conceptual, semiotic, and fantastic.
[there exists] Does Not Formalize Existence. Given the persistent confusions about existence in the literature, from Parmenides to Martin Heidegger to the gravitational waves hunters, it won't harm to repeat again and again Hamlet's most famous saying.
The most egregious of the said confusions is the popular dogma that the so-called existential quantifier [there exists] exactifies the notion of existence in all fields.
This difference is nuanced as it is applied to various states of being and domains of existence, and is seen in the perspective of spiritual realities.
Keywords: manifestation (tajalli) versus displacement (tajafi); aspects of descent across the hierarchy of existence; emanation; illuminationist relations; nature and origination.
For example, in the reflection of a person in a mirror, and despite the real existence of the image of the person in the mirror, nothing is taken from the person himself and he is not any less than he was to begin with.
In the question at hand, De veritate question 21, article 1, in which Aquinas draws a parallel between predications of essences and predications of categories, "mode" emerges as Aquinas's key term of distinction for the individual existences of things: However there are some things that are found to add to being in the second way, since being is contracted according to the ten categories, each of which adds something to being: not any accident, nor any difference which is outside the essence of being, but a determinate mode of existing [determinatum modum essendi], which is based on the very existence of the thing [fundatur in ipsa existentia rei].
When Aquinas posits a sense of being more ultimate than form, namely existence, an account of existential diversity becomes necessary to complete the ancient division of being according to formal differences.
(7) Judging that it exists is the prerequisite of our asking anything else about it: there is something there of which to ask, "What is it?" When we then judge that the being exists in itself rather than in something else--that it is a substance--we judge concerning how it exists, that is, in what way it has existence. Likewise, when we judge that the being is undivided from itself and divided from all else--that it is one--we judge how it exists.
The existence of God is not self-evident to reason, but it is demonstrable.
In God, essence and existence are inseparable, indeed, identical: It belongs to "what" God is "that" God is.
The essence of finite things is separable from their existence.
The "first and more manifest way" Aquinas offers as a proof of God's existence in the argument from finite "motion" to the existence of the first and "unmoved mover." It is crucial to an understanding of the argument that "motion" not be defined in the modern, colloquial sense of action or activity, but rather as the "movement," Aristotle's kinesis, from potential to actual existence.
As before, our experience of the world leads to the postulation of the existence of God, now because of the order that is observably present even in inanimate things--things incapable of ordering themselves.
For Aquinas, this conclusion not only distinguished God from creatures, whose existence and essence are distinct and separable, it also establishes the relationship between God and creatures.