exile

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exile

someone (from something) (to something) to force someone to leave something or some place and go to something or some place, often as a punishment for political reasons. The government exiled him from his hometown to an island off the coast of South America. They exiled Gerald to another country.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second part of the book explores two different examples of exilic societies.
In what ways does the tension between the exilic cultural inheritance and these modern nonexilic elements manifest itself?
Gillespie argues that "[a] good deal of material in [Joyce's] letters and in recollections of friends shows that the anger common to the exilic experience" exudes from the pages of Dubliners, which is, essentially, Gillespie's thesis (36).
This tends to make for a high degree of self-reflexivity in performance, generated by what Meerzon neatly describes as "the exilic artist's self-alienated gaze" (302).
And in our own time, exilic discourse has become an important aspect of these postcolonial investigations since exile is one important social crisis that has affected and altered human affairs in drastic manners in Anglophone West Africa.
Kalfopoulou's latest work, Ruin: Essays in Exilic Living, documents her life as she travels from Edinburgh to New York, Freiburg, then back home to Athens.
Both novels configure the exilic condition at home and in the diaspora, revealing the unfeasibility of fixing an identity in a constant process of becoming.
These subtleties of exilic living are densely woven together in personal and illuminating reflections that demand attentive reading.
However, in the exilic and post-exilic era, some drastic changes in religious life and an unprecedented expansion of Jewry occurred, all of which contributed to the phenomenon of yir'ei Hashem or yir'ei shamayim.
Moving from the 1980s to the 1990s, the second section of Rosales Herrera's work examines Cuban exilic literature published during The Special Period, a prolonged and economically depressed era due to the collapse of the Soviet Union.
This penetrating argument for an exilic Christianity would make a good conversation piece for interfaith dialogue.
By discussing the works of these two writers who despite being contemporaries represent two different perspectives on home' and exile (September-11 being the cut-off point) we have tried to establish the difference between the pre- and post-September 11 exilic perspectives by comparing Ghose's novel Triple Mirror of the Self and his autobiography Confessions of a Native Alien as representations of exile in the classical sense of the word with Hamid's protagonist as a divided liminal figure trying to exist on the cusp of cultures and rediscovering his cultural roots in the wake of September 11 events.
While concentrating on Berlin doctors and writers around Karl Abraham, whose reading circle developed into the Berliner Psychoanalytisches Institut (BPI)--reminiscent of Vienna's Mittwochsgesellschaft--Fuechtner likewise traces the exilic trajectories of psychoanalysts during the ascendancy of Nazism.
Non-P is exilic or postexilic, and P is even later and is more a redaction than an independent source.
Speaking on the Edge of My Tomb': The Epistolary Life and Death of Catherine Talbot," by Celia Barnes Rasmussen; "Conversations as Signifiers: Characters on the Margins of Morality in the First Three Novels of Frances Burney," by Christina Davidson; "Charlotte Smiths Exilic Persona," by Monica Smith Hart; "'Making the Prude' in Charlotte Bronte's Villette," by Julia D.