exile (someone) from (some place)

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exile (someone) from (some place)

To banish someone from some place, often as retribution. The official decree exiled him from France for crimes against the country.
See also: exile
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To be also exiled from this last and essential recourse or haven means the most inhuman dislocation of the human being, a total burning (holocaustos) which touches even the core of creativity".
Kafka "felt exiled from no place he could begin to imagine as his real home; the ultimate modernist, he felt exiled from life itself."
Exiled: Colonial Prisoners Banished from NSW is the result of dedicated research about the men who were 'exiled from prison and banished from NSW'.
Nor has it been easy to understand the merits of the seemingly vacuous and mannered Neoclassicism of David's paintings from Belgium, where, following the fall of the Napoleonic Empire, he was exiled from 1816 until his death.
She has been exiled from Iran, where all her works are banned, and now lives in the United States as a political refugee.
When Ovid was exiled from Rome to Tomis on the Black Sea in about 8 A.D., he continued to write until his death in about 17 A.D.
Thomas Mann, exiled from Germany during the Second World War, found that he both loved and hated his country, explaining that it is "[T]errible when one's own country is the enemy place" (Robinson, 1994:100-104).
Antonio Michieli, exiled from Siena and ordered to stay beyond the Apennines, settled in the duchy of Milan and had the good fortune to be appointed podesta of Pavia and later of Cremona.
millions of Palestinians exiled from their land, living without fixed
geographically, separated by borders, exiled from one another.
Dante is exiled from Florence whilst Ovid is exiled to Tomis.
Richmond's Project Exile derives its name from the concept that any criminals found in possession of a gun, or convicted of using a gun in the commission of a crime, forfeit their right to remain in the community, thereby exiled from the area.
When the Medici were exiled from Florence in the late summer of 1433, Bruni remained as chancellor for the new regime.
In the opening essay, "Bonding and Bondage: Nancy Cunard and the Making of the Negro Anthology," Jane Marcus offers an impassioned brief for a woman who lived her life in exile and has in death been exiled from the histories of the movements (Modernism, African and African American Studies, and British Left politics of the 1930s-1950s) that she did much to shape.