exile (someone) to (some place)

(redirected from exile to)

exile (someone) to (some place)

To banish someone from one place to another, often as retribution. The official decree exiled him to his native country.
See also: exile, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
This reading underscores the continuing importance of studies on exile to our broader understandings of the workings and collapse of the state.
This subaltern geography opens up ground for alternative spaces of exile to emerge that challenge dichotomies of home/exile.
Peddie addresses the fundamental shift from exile to immigrant, and traces the all-important impacts of family, work, and gender in their entrenchment within Canadian society.
In the same vein, the media, especially the electronic media also makes it possible for an exile to be conversant with events at home.
Others felt they had developed a detachment from place during their exile to Canada, so that where they lived became secondary to other concerns such as family, employment, and other life goals.
"His Father is King, but he voluntarily went on exile to a world which was totally different from his Father's Kingdom," our pastor friend continued.
The group further said the journalists were forced into exile to escape different forms of intimidation, violence, imprisonment, and death threats during the past year.
The title From Exile to Exile gives a hint of the trajectory of Edmund's life experience--from his forced exile to the UK, to his euphoric return to South Africa after the momentous 1994 democratic transformation and, ultimately, his disillusionment with the politics of the new South Africa that prompted his return to Britain into a 'second exile'.
D'Addario adapts Edward Said's post-colonial concept of exile to assert that the nostalgic turn to the past that characterizes so much of exilic writing was a response to the memory of their lost world, but importantly, it also served a "polemical or public purpose" (11) to reconfigure the exile as central to their homeland's current condition--"the saving remnant of an English nation hopelessly led astray" (11).
Rather than arguing for or against the creeds, he points to the need for theologians of exile to give up "a spirit of control" (79).
D'Addario succeeds in his aim "to outline, at least provisionally, the importance of exile to our understanding of prominent literary, religious, and philosophical texts, indeed some of the foundational elements of the early modern canon" (3).
I will examine whether women writers consider exile to be a safe place in which to describe the horrific experiences of gender specific persecution and of being a victim of violence in conflict or whether taboos restrict the women's voice.
Said's unique experiences, his history and his engagement with music and text allowed this exile to dance on the margins of life, like no other, in double time, contrapuntally, surrendering to the song of life which he still sings to us with passionate and intellectual majesty.
scattering is also good." (13) The exile to Babylon then becomes on
For example, television and radio commercials, billboards, and business cards bearing the slogan, "An illegal gun gets you 5 years in federal prison," all have helped to bring Project Exile to the attention of the community.