exercise

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exercise for the reader

A subject, debate, or other matter that is not decided or dealt with directly by the author or presenter, but rather is left up to the judgment or interpretation of the observer, reader, or addressee. The report merely details the spending practices of the parties concerned; whether or not these payments were dubious in nature is left as an exercise for the reader. The politician's speech made broad references to invigorating the economy with practical, no-nonsense measures—what such measures might be, though, was left as an exercise for the reader.
See also: exercise, reader

exercise (someone) in (something)

To help someone or an animal to practice something. Will you exercise me in these chemistry terms before the tomorrow's test?
See also: exercise

exercise power over (someone or something)

To show that one has control or authority over someone or something. Even though we're adults now, my sister still tries to exercise power over me like I'm a little kid.
See also: exercise, over, power

exercised about (something)

Upset or agitated because of something. We can't tell mom we broke the vase—she'll get totally exercised about it! Before you get exercised about it, let me tell you exactly what happened.
See also: exercise

exercise power over

someone or something and exercise control over someone or something; exercise influence over someone or something to have someone or something under one's control or influence. The dictator exercised power over the island for many years. See if you can exercise some control over your appetite. I wish I could exercise some influence over the committee.
See also: exercise, over, power

exercise (someone or an animal) in

something to give someone or an animal practice in doing something; to drill someone or an animal at something. Please exercise the dog in obedience routines. I hope you will exercise me in my Spanish irregular verbs.
See also: exercise

exercised about something

Fig. upset about something. Mary: You lost a hundred dollars playing poker!? Bill: Now don't get exercised about it. I can't tell Ma I'm failing English class. She gets exercised about every dumb thing I do.
See also: exercise

*firm hand

Fig. [someone's] strong sense of management; a high degree of discipline and direction. (*Typically: exercise ~; have ~; need ~; take ~; use~.) I had to use a firm hand with Perry when he was a child. He had a problem with discipline.
See also: firm, hand

the object of the exercise

the main point or purpose of an activity.
See also: exercise, object, of
References in classic literature ?
Misery and poverty are so absolutely degrading, and exercise such a paralysing effect over the nature of men, that no class is ever really conscious of its own suffering.
It degrades those who exercise it, and degrades those over whom it is exercised.
I think that the according of the full exercise of political rights is going to be a matter of natural, slow growth, not an over-night, gourd-vine affair.
There is a Physical objection to the present rage for muscular exercises of all sorts, which is quite as strong, in its way, as the Moral objection.
But if you insist on my producing an example of a man broken by athletic exercises, I can do it.
Further, he of whom we are in search should have a good memory, and be an unwearied solid man who is a lover of labour in any line; or he will never be able to endure the great amount of bodily exercise and to go through all the intellectual discipline and study which we require of him.
Bodily exercise, when compulsory, does no harm to the body; but knowledge which is acquired under compulsion obtains no hold on the mind.
Poulter, if you're going to do the exercise," said Tom, a little conscious that he had not stood his ground as became an Englishman, "let me go and call Philip.
An experiment of this nature would always be hazardous in the face of a constitution in any degree competent to its own defense, and of a people enlightened enough to distinguish between a legal exercise and an illegal usurpation of authority.
The sum of what has been here advanced and proved is, that the charge against the convention of exceeding their powers, except in one instance little urged by the objectors, has no foundation to support it; that if they had exceeded their powers, they were not only warranted, but required, as the confidential servants of their country, by the circumstances in which they were placed, to exercise the liberty which they assume; and that finally, if they had violated both their powers and their obligations, in proposing a Constitution, this ought nevertheless to be embraced, if it be calculated to accomplish the views and happiness of the people of America.
But to exercise the intellect the prince should read histories, and study there the actions of illustrious men, to see how they have borne themselves in war, to examine the causes of their victories and defeat, so as to avoid the latter and imitate the former; and above all do as an illustrious man did, who took as an exemplar one who had been praised and famous before him, and whose achievements and deeds he always kept in his mind, as it is said Alexander the Great imitated Achilles, Caesar Alexander, Scipio Cyrus.
The large table covered with books and plans, the tall glass-fronted bookcases with keys in the locks, the high desk for writing while standing up, on which lay an open exercise book, and the lathe with tools laid ready to hand and shavings scattered around- all indicated continuous, varied, and orderly activity.
He took the exercise book containing lessons in geometry written by himself and drew up a chair with his foot.
A REVIVALIST who had fallen dead in the pulpit from too violent religious exercise was astonished to wake up in Hades.
And I learned that more sleep is required for physical exercise than for mental exercise.