excuse

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excuse someone

 
1. . to forgive someone. (Usually with me. Said when interrupting or when some other minor offense has been committed. There are many mannerly uses of this expression.) John came in late and said, "Excuse me, please." John said "excuse me" when he interrupted our conversation. When John made a strange noise at the table, he said quietly, "Excuse me." John suddenly left the room saying, "Excuse me. I'll be right back."
2. to permit someone to leave; to permit someone to remain away from an event. The coach excused John from practice yesterday. The teacher excused John, and he ran quickly from the room.
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References in classic literature ?
Setting his own interests out of the question, Hardyman owed obligations to the kindness of his illustrious correspondent which made it impossible for him to send an excuse. In a fortnight's time, at the latest, it would be necessary for him to leave England; and a month or more might elapse before it would be possible for him to return.
While the apology made for Miss Pink stated no more than the plain truth, it must be confessed that Hardyman was right in declining to be satisfied with Isabel's excuse for the melancholy that oppressed her.
In the rough draught of it, he had mentioned, as his excuse for not being yet certain of his own movements, that he expected to be immediately married.
"Excuse me," said D'Artagnan, reappearing under the shoulder of the giant, "but I am in such haste--I was running after someone and--"
"Now is my time to make peace with this gallant man," said D'Artagnan to himself, having stood on one side during the whole of the latter part of the conversation; and with this good feeling drawing near to Aramis, who was departing without paying any attention to him, "Monsieur," said he, "you will excuse me, I hope."
"An excuse for keeping away from Monksmoor--in the interests of my own tranquillity.
I can make no excuse for myself; I can only tell the truth, and say--so it was.
Fairlie to say that I would wait on him to take leave if he liked, but that he must excuse my being rather in a hurry.
Monsieur Thuran had been trying to find an excuse to make a graceful departure.
"Do not forget that I am just waiting for some excuse." Then he turned on his heel, and left Rokoff standing there trembling with suppressed rage.
'Unnecessary to pursue the subject,' returned Flora, 'and would not have mentioned it on any account except as supposing it a favourable and only letter of introduction but as to being fact no doubt whatever and you may set your mind at rest for the very dress I have on now can prove it and sweetly made though there is no denying that it would tell better on a better figure for my own is much too fat though how to bring it down I know not, pray excuse me I am roving off again.' Mr Dorrit backed to his chair in a stony way, and seated himself, as Flora gave him a softening look and played with her parasol.
'Mr Dorrit,' said Flora, 'you are very kind in giving me permission and highly natural it seems to me that you should be kind for though more stately I perceive a likeness filled out of course but a likeness still, the object of my intruding is my own without the slightest consultation with any human being and most decidedly not with Arthur--pray excuse me Doyce and Clennam I don't know what I am saying Mr Clennam solus--for to put that individual linked by a golden chain to a purple time when all was ethereal out of any anxiety would be worth to me the ransom of a monarch not that I have the least idea how much that would come to but using it as the total of all I have in the world and more.'
Excuses, he tells us, excuse wrongful conduct "by shedding favourable moral light on what D did through a focus on the reasons that D committed that wrongdoing, where those reasons played a morally 'active' role in D's conduct (meaning that what D did or what happened to D can be subject to critical moral evaluation)." [9] This emphasis on the "morally active" reasons for an actor's conduct, which is central to Horder's notion of excusing, may incline some readers to think about the normative judgments inherent in justification defenses, and Horder's taxonomy acknowledges that some excuses--those characterized by strong "actively justificatory" elements (3)--may come very close to being justification claims.
After the first time, it got easier to find excuses not to visit my grandfather.
Their study involves the reasons for excuses, small and large, and the philosophical and psychological forces behind each, including creating a positive image, masquerading for past or the future, and gaining control.