exception


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with the exception of

With the exclusion of a particular thing. I really enjoy my new job, with the exception of the long hours.
See also: exception, of

there is an exception to every rule

Rules are not as clear, permanent, and unchanging as they may seem. A: "I'm so relieved that the principal has not punished my daughter for missing more days of school than school policy allows." B: "Well, she was very sick. There is an exception to every rule." As much as I try to remind her that there is an exception to every rule, my grandmother remains totally inflexible.
See also: every, exception, rule, there

be the exception that proves the rule

To contradict a rule and thus confirm that the rule exists. A: "We're always told to get eight hours of sleep, but I usually feel really groggy when I sleep that much." B: "Well, I guess you're the exception that proves the rule."
See also: exception, prove, rule, that

take exception to (something)

To strongly disagree with or take offense at something. Excuse me, but I take exception to being characterized as some sort of opportunist, just because I happened to make some good investments before the economy collapsed. I know she takes exception to the way the newspaper represented the data from her study.
See also: exception, take

take exception

To strongly disagree with or take offense at something. If that's what you're saying, then yes, I take exception. Excuse me, but I take exception to being characterized as some sort of opportunist, just because I happened to make some good investments before the economy collapsed.
See also: exception, take

the exception that proves the rule

That which contradicts or goes against a supposed rule, and therefore proves it in one's mind. A: "Video games are all just mindless filth that rots kids' brains." B: "I don't know, a lot of them let kids express themselves creatively or learn about the world in new ways." A: "Bah, those are just the exceptions that prove the rule."
See also: exception, prove, rule, that

the exception proves the rule

That which contradicts or goes against a supposed rule therefore proves that it is almost always true. A: "Video games are all just mindless filth that rots kids' brains." B: "I don't know, a lot of them let kids express themselves creatively or learn about the world in new ways." A: "Bah, the exceptions just prove the rule."
See also: exception, prove, rule

without exception

True of all people or things being described. All employees without exception will be required to undergo and pass a drug screening test before their probationary period is over. Without exception, every single household in the state is being overcharged for their water usage.
See also: exception, without

make an exception

To allow someone or something to forego or bypass a usual rule, law, or standard. Often followed by "for (someone)." I usually don't let students hand in any assignments late, but considering the recent circumstances with your family, I'm willing to make an exception. We have to be firm with our rules for the kids—if we keep making exceptions like this, they won't take us seriously.
See also: exception, make

The exception proves the rule.

Prov. Something that does not follow a rule shows that the rule exists. (Often used facetiously, to justify some rule you have proposed but which someone else has listed exceptions. From a Latin phrase meaning that an exception tests a rule.) Ellen: Men are always rude. Jane: But Alan's always polite. And Larry and Ted are polite, too. Ellen: They're just the exceptions that prove the rule. Bill: All the shows on TV are aimed at people with low intelligence. Alan: What about that news program you like to watch? Bill: The exception proves the rule.
See also: exception, prove, rule

make an exception (for someone)

to suspend a rule or practice for someone in a single instance. Please make an exception just this once. The rule is a good one, and I will not make an exception for anyone.
See also: exception, make

take exception

 (to something)
1. to take offense at something. I must take exception to your remark. Sue took exception to Fred's characterization of Bill as a cheapskate.
2. to disagree with something. I have to take exception to the figure you quoted. The manager took exception to the statement about having only three employees.
See also: exception, take

except for

Also, with the exception of. Other than, were it not for. For example, Except for Jack, everyone came to the party, or With the exception of the weather, everything went extremely well. [c. 1600]
See also: except

exception proves the rule, the

An instance that does not obey a rule shows that the rule exists. For example, John's much shorter than average but excels at basketball-the exception proves the rule . This seemingly paradoxical phrase is the converse of the older idea that every rule has an exception. [Mid-1600s]
See also: exception, prove

make an exception

Exempt someone or something from a general rule or practice, as in Because it's your birthday, I'll make an exception and let you stay up as late as you want . This expression was first recorded about 1391.
See also: exception, make

take exception to

Disagree with, object to, as in I take exception to that remark about unfair practices. This idiom, first recorded in 1542, uses exception in the sense of "objection," a meaning obsolete except in a few phrases.
See also: exception, take

the exception that proves the rule

You say that something is the exception that proves the rule to mean that the example that you have just mentioned is not normal and is the opposite of what you usually find. Towers should generally be arranged in clusters, but the Post Office Tower was the exception that proved the rule — it needs to stand alone so that its signals are not interrupted. The most creative minds are often said to be the product of a problematic childhood, but Hornby must be the exception that proves the rule. Note: `Prove' here means `to test by experiment or analysis' rather than `to establish as true'. So, the meaning is that an exception tests a rule, not that it establishes the rule as true in all other situations.
See also: exception, prove, rule, that

the exception that proves the rule

a particular case that is so unusual that it is evidence of the validity of the rule that generally applies.
This phrase comes from the Latin legal maxim exceptio probat regulum in casibus non exceptis ‘exception proves the rule in the cases not excepted’. This in fact meant that the recognition of something as an exception proved the existence of a rule, but the idiom is popularly used or understood to mean ‘a person or thing that does not conform to the general rule affecting others of that class’
1998 Spectator The success of The Full Monty in the United States is an exception which proves the rule. On such lucky breaks, industries and economies are not built.
See also: exception, prove, rule, that

the exˈception that proves the ˈrule

(saying) people say that something is the exception that proves the rule when they are stating something that seems to be different from the normal situation, but they mean that the normal situation remains true in general: English people are supposed to be very reserved, but Pete is the exception that proves the rule — he’ll chat to anyone!
See also: exception, prove, rule, that

make an exˈception

allow somebody not to follow the usual rule on one occasion: Children are not usually allowed in, but I’m prepared to make an exception in this case.
See also: exception, make

take exˈception to something

be very offended by a remark, suggestion, etc: I take great exception to your suggestion that I only did this for the money.

with the exˈception of

except; not including: All his novels are set in Italy with the exception of his last.
See also: exception, of

without exˈception

used to emphasize that the statement you are making is always true and everyone or everything is included: All students without exception must take the English examination.
See also: exception, without

except for

Were it not for: I would join you except for my cold.
See also: except

take exception

To express opposition by argument; object to: took exception to the prosecutor's line of questioning.
See also: exception, take

exception proves the rule, the

Although something may not conform to it, the general rule is still valid. This term originated in the 1500s and is considered a proverb. Playwright Thomas Heywood used it in The Rape of Lucrece (1608), “If the general rule have no exceptions, thou wilt have an empty consistory.” However, in the 1800s several scholars maintained that “proves” in this phrase actually means “tests” (and not “verifies”). Whichever is intended, the phrase is still used, as in “Jane was the only woman who opposed this measure; well, the exception proves the rule.”
See also: exception, prove
References in periodicals archive ?
To do this, we look through the semantic exception hierarchy (as discussed in Section 2.2).
"Afghanistan's proposed narrow reading of the noncommercial tort exception would not so much be a reading of the statue as it would be a decision that the terrorism exception amounts to a partial repeal by implication of the noncommercial tort exception.
But Justice Roberts noted that "there may be instances in which a need for uniformity precludes the recognition of exceptions to generally applicable laws under RFRA." Furthermore, Roberts said RFRA called on courts to carefully balance competing interests.
Through these cases, the Supreme Court has carved out an exception to the warrant requirement that can be reduced to some basic guiding principles.
When you have that kind of talent facing off with home office underwriters, exceptions escalate, as indeed they have.
Secondly, one exception to one principle justifies exceptions to all other principles.
With two exceptions, no other pronoun is ever capitalized.
The limitations include lack of time-bounded handler determination, no support for external handling, lack of any form of criticality management, and no suitable exception specification for operating-system-based mechanisms.
The exceptions acknowledge that higher loan to income (LTI) and loan to value (LTV) mortgages can be appropriate in certain circumstances.
ENPNewswire-July 29, 2019--Central Bank of Ireland-Financial Stability Note: Fifth of all mortgages in 2018 availed of exceptions from mortgage measures requirements
Additionally, "A trading partner or stakeholder may submit a renewal request for any waiver, exception, or exemption it received that is of limited duration.
Compared with the exploitability estimation method, the exploitability test method is more accurate, but the technology is still in the preliminary research stage--the scale of the object being analyzed must be small (the vast score can only analyze small-scale software), and the applicable exception sample data type is limited.
(28) To reject or modify a presiding officer's conclusions of law, the agency is required to "state with particularity its reasons for rejecting or modifying such conclusion of law or interpretation of administrative rule and must make a finding that its substituted conclusion of law or interpretation of administrative rule is as or more reasonable than that which was rejected or modified." (29) Practitioners should formulate exceptions to conclusions of law with these criteria in mind; if the exception matches the requirements in the statute, an agency is more likely to adopt the party's reasoning as its own.
Each of the 11 main papers is augmented with an invited critical commentary, and a response by the original author or authors, in order to further enliven already lively debates over exceptions in grammar.