examine

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examine (one) for (something)

To look closely at someone or something in search of something in particular. Please examine the patient in bed one for signs of infection.
See also: examine

examine (one) in (something)

To test one on their knowledge in a particular subject or area. A noun or pronoun can be used between "examine" and "in." The department head will examine you in all literature from the Restoration through the Victorian age.
See also: examine

examine (one) on (something)

To test one on their knowledge in a particular subject or area. A noun or pronoun can be used between "examine" and "on." The department head will examine you on all literature from the Restoration through the Victorian age.
See also: examine, on

need (one's) head examined

To do, say, or believe something that seems completely crazy, delusional, or stupid. You need your head examined if you don't think giant corporations are in control of our legislators! You spent $400 on a T-shirt? You need your head examined.
See also: examine, head, need

want (one's) head examined

To be, do, say, or believe something that seems completely crazy, delusional, or stupid. You want your head examined if you don't think giant corporations are in control of our legislators! You spent $400 on a T-shirt? You want your head examined.
See also: examine, head, want

get (one's) head examined

What one is said to need to do if one does, says, or believes something that seems completely crazy, delusional, or stupid. You need to get your head examined if you don't think giant corporations are in control of our legislators! You spent $400 on a T-shirt? You need to get your head examined.
See also: examine, get, head

have (one's) head examined

What one is said to need to do if one does, says, or believes something that seems completely crazy, delusional, or stupid. You need to have your head examined if you don't think giant corporations are in control of our legislators! You spent $400 on a T-shirt? You need to have your head examined.
See also: examine, have, head

cross-examine (someone)

1. In law, to question a witness or suspect after the opposing side has already done so, as to undermine or clarify their testimony. I have doubts that that witness is telling the truth, and I'll expose it when I cross-examine him.
2. By extension, to question someone thoroughly. Geez Mom, why are you cross-examining me? I told you the truth—I was at Kelly's house all night.

cross-examine someone

to question someone in court who has already been questioned by the opposing side; to question a suspect or a witness at great length. The lawyer plans to cross-examine the witness tomorrow morning. The police cross-examined the suspect for three hours.

examine someone in something

to give someone an examination in a particular subject or covering certain material. The committee examined her in her knowledge of history. I was examined in math.
See also: examine

examine someone on something

to give someone an examination covering certain material. I will have to examine you on this chapter myself. The teacher examined Larry on his understanding of phonetics.
See also: examine, on

examine someone or something for something

to inspect someone or something for the presence of something. I examined the child for signs of abuse. You had better examine this dog for ticks. Don't forget to examine yourself for ticks after you return from the hike.
See also: examine

get one's head examined

Also, have one's head examined. One is crazy or absolutely wrong. For example, You like this food? Go get your head examined, or If you believe that story, you should have your head examined. This hyperbolic and usually jocular expression of disagreement may, thought Eric Partridge, allude to the now discredited field of phrenology, which holds that the configurations of the skull reveal mental and emotional characteristics. [Early 1900s]
See also: examine, get, head

need your head examined

be foolishly irresponsible.
The implication here is that the examination will reveal proof of insanity.
1992 Patrick McCabe The Butcher Boy Any man thinks this work is easy needs his head examined—you want to be tough to work here!
See also: examine, head, need

need, want, etc. your ˈhead examined

(informal) used for saying that somebody is behaving in a crazy or stupid way: She spent $300 on a pair of shoes? She needs her head examined.
See also: examine, head
References in periodicals archive ?
After examining a community career services program at a university career center, McKinnon stressed the importance of providing holistic and integrative career counseling, meeting adult needs such as increased evening hours, and creating a bridge between the university and community.
The use of historical information on disability issues provides an excellent foundation for examining the effects of disability polices on individuals, their families, and their communities today.
the only published guidance currently available) is limited in scope, section 5 of the proposed procedure seemingly requires that examining agents treat every adjustment for a timing issue as a change in method of accounting with a one-year [sections] 481(a) adjustment spread period in the earliest taxable year under examination.
Analyzing these alternative measures may be important, since, in many cases, examining solely the relationship between VR services and earnings may understate the actual impact of VR services on clients' labor market experiences.
This case study investigates the impact of network-enabled C2 capabilities on coalition military operations by examining in depth the insights and lessons learned by:
1999) The Musician's Soul: A Journey Examining Spirituality for Performers, Teachers, Composers, Conductors, and Music Educators.
Auditors examining the businesses will focus on eight primary areas: nonqualified deferred compensation, stock-based compensation, the $1 million cap on compensation paid to public company officers, golden parachute arrangements, split-dollar life insurance, fringe benefits and the use of two listed transactions (family limited partnerships and offshore employee leasing).
The book begins with a fine introduction by Mark Vessey and is then divided, somewhat arbitrarily, into eight chapters examining Erasmus' production of the Paraphrases and five examining their reception, including the printing process and translation into French and English.
By examining the physical arrangement, daily schedule, and communication systems they currently have in place, participants could determine if any of these practices were barriers or benefits to facilitating family involvement in the program.
These include sponsorship of scientific workshops to further research in key areas such as characterizing cardiac health effects associated with PM exposures, assessing costs and health benefits of air pollution controls, examining the health impacts of gasoline emissions in California, and apportioning PM sources and their associated health effects.
Also examining the effectiveness of a program, Linnehan investigated the effects of a work-based mentoring program on the academic performance and behavior of African American high school students.
The book is organized into three sections beginning with chapters examining prescriptions for female identity.
As a result, she calls for a discourse - written by black women - that resists the institutionalized language of poststructuralist theory and finds its strength in examining the history of (and the reasons behind) the emergence of black feminism.