evidence

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give evidence of (something)

To provide proof or confirmation of something. Yeah, you can use your driver's license to give evidence of your mailing address. Her 30-page paper gave evidence of her extensive knowledge on the topic.
See also: evidence, give, of

in evidence

1. Evident; plainly visible. All the renovations you made to the house are clearly in evidence. I think prospective buyers will be impressed. Jason said he's been cleaning his room all day, but I just went up there, and I didn't see much progress in evidence.
2. As evidence in a court proceeding. The attorney handed the judge the documents so she could admit them in evidence.
See also: evidence

much in evidence

Very noticeable, conspicuous, or apparent. The players have been working hard to improve their trust and confidence in one another, and it was very much in evidence during their impressive display on the field this past weekend. As the two foreign leaders traded insults, diplomacy was no longer much in evidence.
See also: evidence, much

turn king's/queen's evidence

To provide evidence in court implicating other parties involved in the crime for which one has been charged, in order to receive a reduced sentence or to avoid prosecution altogether. Primarily heard in UK. We're leaning on him pretty hard, so we think he'll turn king's evidence and finger his accomplices.
See also: evidence, turn

turn state's evidence

To admit guilt in some crime and agree to give evidence against one's accomplices in court in order to avoid or receive a reduced prison sentence. Many are speculating that the administrative aide taken into custody will agree to turn state's evidence against the senator.
See also: evidence, turn

give evidence of something

to show signs of something; to give proof of something. You are going to have to give evidence of your good faith in this matter. A nominal deposit would be fine. She gave evidence of being prepared to go to trial, so we settled the case.
See also: evidence, give, of

much in evidence

Cliché very visible or evident. John was much in evidence during the conference. Your influence is much in evidence. I appreciate your efforts.
See also: evidence, much

in evidence

1. Also, much in evidence. Plainly visible, conspicuous, as in The car's new dents were very much in evidence. [Second half of 1800s]
2. As testimony in a court of law, as in The attorney submitted the photograph in evidence. [c. 1700]
See also: evidence

in ˈevidence

present and clearly seen: There were very few local people in evidence at the meeting.What’s the matter with John? His sense of humour hasn’t been much in evidence recently.
See also: evidence

turn King’s/Queen’s ˈevidence

(British English) (American English turn State’s ˈevidence) give information against other criminals in order to get a less severe punishment: One of the gang turned State’s evidence and identified at least three others involved in the fraud.
See also: evidence, turn

evidence

n. liquor. (Usually with the. Incorporated into a suggestion that the evidence be destroyed by drinking it.) There is only one thing to do with evidence like this, and that’s drink it.

in evidence

1. Plainly visible; to be seen: It was early, and few pedestrians were in evidence on the city streets.
2. Law As legal evidence: submitted the photograph in evidence.
See also: evidence

turn state's evidence

To give such testimony in court.
See also: evidence, turn
References in classic literature ?
"I do not think"--Poirot watched him narrowly--"that you quite realize the unfavourable nature of your evidence at the inquest.
Although we have reason to believe from geological evidence that the whole body of arctic shells underwent scarcely any modification during their long southern migration and re-migration northward, the case may have been wholly different with those intruding forms which settled themselves on the intertropical mountains, and in the southern hemisphere.
After briefly consulting together, the Judges unanimously decided that the evidence could not be admitted.
Ignorant as I was of the law, I could see what impression the evidence (so far) was intended to produce on the minds of the jury.
In the face of such evidence as this, cross-examination was a mere form.
Price's book is testimony to our difficulty in linking the amazing creativity of Shakespeare's works with the mundane and scanty evidences of his life.
Shakespeare's Unorthodox Biography: New Evidence of an Authorship Problem.
Her aim is to place the documentary evidence about his life, which often deals with legal and financial matters, into a cultural context that includes Shakespeare's writings and those of his contemporaries.
(Since Shakespeare's lack of a university education has often been advanced by anti-Strarfordians as evidence that he could not have written the plays and poems, she makes the telling point that Ben Jonson, whose classical learning far exceeded Shakespeare's, did not go to one either.) It is not Duncan-Jones' intention to write a chronological biography, but rather to focus on important "scenes" of Shakespeare's career, including his emergence in the London theater in the 1590s, his sometimes ambivalent rivalries with other writers such as Nashe, Marston, and Jonson, his attempts to establish himself as gentrified by getting his coat of arms approved, his ownership of shares in his theatrical company and of substantial real estate, his involvement in litigation.
But Duncan-Jones reads the available documentary evidence from a single-minded and sometimes distorted perspective in order to prove that he was a dislikable, even reprehensible character.
"It is not an assertion of the right on the part of the government, always recognized under English and American law, to search the person of the accused when legally arrested, to discover and seize the fruits or evidences of crime.
The right of an officer to search incident to an arrest is not limited to situations where weapons or evidence of the crime are likely to be found.
"When a man is legally arrested for an offense, whatever is found upon his person or in his control which it is unlawful for him to have and which may be used to prove the offense may be seized and held as evidence in the prosecution."(27)
They seized evidence that was used at his trial over his objection.
Courts have long agreed that arresting officers may search the arrestee and the immediate area for weapons of any kind and for any object that could aid the arrestee's escape.(45) Evidence of crime - any crime - is also a legitimate object of the search incident to arrest.(46) The Supreme Court has specifically rejected attempts to limit searches incident to arrest only to evidence of the crime for which the arrest was made.(47)