everybody


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a good word for everybody

A friendly, amiable, and positive regard for one and all. He was my favorite professor, always a smile on his face and a good word for everybody.
See also: everybody, good, word

a kind word for everybody

A friendly, amiable, and positive regard for one and all. I believe that if I can have a kind word for everybody, I will end up making other people's lives that much better.
See also: everybody, kind, word

everyone and their brother

A large number or a majority of people. Used hyperbolically. Everyone and their brother is going to be at the wedding this July, I hope I can make it too.
See also: and, brother, everyone

burst the bubble of (someone)

To upset or destroy someone's belief, conviction, or mood by delivering news that runs contrary to what they hold to be true. I hate to burst the bubble of everyone here, but this period of economic success will not last long.
See also: bubble, burst, of

bust (one's) chops

1. (acting upon oneself) To exert a significant amount of energy or work very hard to do, accomplish, or complete something. I've been busting my chops all night long to get this presentation ready for tomorrow's meeting. She's going to have to bust her chops if she wants a place on the varsity team.
2. (acting upon someone else) To harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is busting everyone's chops to get the project ready by next week. Quit busting my chops! I'll get it done eventually!
See also: bust, chops

bust (one's) balls

1. vulgar slang (acting upon oneself) To exert a significant amount of energy to do, accomplish, or complete something, especially with great haste. I've been busting my balls all night long to get this presentation ready for tomorrow's meeting. She's going to have to bust her balls if she wants a place on the varsity team.
2. vulgar slang (acting upon someone else) To harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is busting everyone's balls to get the project ready by next week. Quit busting my balls! I'll get it done eventually!
3. vulgar slang (acting upon someone else) To tease, ridicule, or mock someone, usually jocosely. Don't get so worked up, man, I'm just busting your balls. I like her family, but her uncle always busts my balls when we see him.
See also: ball, bust

bust (one's) hump

1. (acting upon oneself) To exert a significant amount of energy to do, accomplish, or complete something, especially with great haste. I've been busting my hump all night long to get this presentation ready for tomorrow's meeting. She's going to have to bust her hump if she wants a place on the varsity team.
2. (acting upon someone else) To harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is busting everyone's hump to get the project ready by next week. Quit busting my hump! I'll get it done eventually!
See also: bust, hump

everybody and his cousin

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his cousin is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, cousin, everybody

everybody and his dog

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his dog is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, dog, everybody

everybody and his mother

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his mother is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, mother

everybody and their mother

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and their mother is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, mother

everybody and his mum

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. Primarily heard in UK. I'm so jealous, everybody and his mum is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, mum

everybody and their mum

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. Primarily heard in UK. I'm so jealous, everybody and their mum is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, mum

everybody and his uncle

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his uncle is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, uncle

everybody and their brother

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and their brother is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, brother, everybody

everybody and their dog

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and their dog is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, dog, everybody

puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)

A saying emphasizing that someone is just an ordinary human being. (Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. Variations of "everybody else" are also often used, such as "the rest of us," "you and me," "ordinary people," and so on.) Primarily heard in UK. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they put their trousers on one leg at a time, just like everybody else. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book provides a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her trousers on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. I might be the youngest billionaire in the world, but I still put my trousers on one leg at a time!
See also: everybody, leg, like, on, one, put, time, trouser

put (one's) pants on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)

To be an ordinary human being; to go through life like everyone else. (Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. Variations of "everybody else" are also often used, such as "the rest of us," "you and me," "ordinary people," and so on.) Primarily heard in Australia. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they are just human beings who put their pants on one leg at a time. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book gives you a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her pants on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. Even though I made my millions at a young age, I was determined that I would still put my pants on one leg at a time just like everybody else.
See also: everybody, leg, like, on, one, pant, put, time

put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)

To be an ordinary human being; to go through life like everyone else. (Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. Variations of "everybody else" are also often used, such as "the rest of us," "you and me," "ordinary people," and so on.) Primarily heard in UK. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they are just human beings who put their trousers on one leg at a time. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book gives you a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her trousers on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. Even though I made my millions at a young age, I was determined that I would still put my trousers on one leg at a time just like everybody else.
See also: everybody, leg, like, on, one, put, time, trouser

(one) puts (one's) pants on one leg at a time

Someone being spoken of or referred to is just an ordinary human being. Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. The phrase is often followed by "just like everybody else." Primarily heard in US. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they put their pants on one leg at a time, just like everybody else. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book provides a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her pants on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. I might be the youngest billionaire in the world, but I still put my pants on one leg at a time!
See also: leg, on, one, pant, put, time

everybody and his brother

A lot of people. The phrase is not only used to apply to men. Geez, everybody and his brother was riding the subway with me this morning—I could barely push through the crowd at my stop!
See also: and, brother, everybody

everybody loves a lord

The rich and powerful attract love and admiration. A: "No one paid attention to me until I became mayor." B: "Well, everybody loves a lord."
See also: everybody, lord, love

knock (someone's) heads together

To forcefully make two or more people act, behave, or think in way that is appropriate or necessary. We're so far behind because your team keeps procrastinating. You need to go in their and knock their heads together. She claimed she would go into the negotiations and knock everyone's heads together until a deal was reached.
See also: head, knock, together

bang (someone's) heads together

To forcefully make two or more people act, behave, or think in way that is appropriate or necessary. We're so far behind because your team keeps procrastinating. You need to go in their and bang their heads together. She claimed she would go into the negotiations and bang everyone's heads together until a deal was reached.
See also: bang, head, together

everybody and his brother

 and everybody and his uncle
Fig. everybody; lots of people. The state fair was packed. Everybody and his brother was there. Everybody and his uncle was asking me where you was today.
See also: and, brother, everybody

Everybody loves a lord.

Prov. People are attracted to the wealthy and powerful. Although the prince was vulgar and unpleasant, he always received plenty of invitations to social gatherings; everybody loves a lord.
See also: everybody, lord, love
References in classic literature ?
Me and Huck's found Jubiter Dunlap's corpse all by ourselves with a bloodhound, after everybody else had quit hunting and given it up; and if it hadn't a been for us it never WOULD 'a' been found; and he WAS murdered too--they done it with a club or something like that; and I'm going to start in and find the murderer, next, and I bet I'll do it
We took off our hats to our acquaintances of the table d'hote, and the lady, in return, presented us with a little smile and a curtsey, for which everybody might be thankful.
Everybody had remarked that something had passed between the king and queen; but both of them had spoken so low that everybody, out of respect, withdrew several steps, so that nobody had heard anything.
The queen attributed this joyous feeling to the beauty of the fete, to the pleasure she had experienced in the ballet; and as it is not permissible to contradict a queen, whether she smile or weep, everybody expatiated on the gallantry of the aldermen of the city of Paris.
She was immediately surrounded by supplications; everybody asked it; even Edmund said, "Do, Fanny, if it is not very disagreeable to you.
Everybody was satisfied; and she was left to the tremors of a most palpitating heart, while the others prepared to begin.
he said, and everybody listened except the poor Catherine Wheel, who was still shaking her head, and murmuring, "Romance is dead.
I am always thinking about myself, and I expect everybody else to do the same.
The only thing that sustains one through life is the consciousness of the immense inferiority of everybody else, and this is a feeling that I have always cultivated.
It is so entrancing that everybody lies awake to listen to us.
Arguments are extremely vulgar, for everybody in good society holds exactly the same opinions.
An' Billy says--an' what d'ye think he said, with everybody lookin' on an' Butch with blood in his eye?
He's got a rep as a fighter, an' when he just stood back 'an' let Butch have his way, everybody knew he wasn't scared, or backin' down, or anything.
But Billy had done the right thing--done it slowly and imperturbably and with the least hurt to everybody.
Everybody high level everybody it and stepped Kevin de The fact that they have already conceded more than Chelsea did in 2004-05, when they set a record of 15, tells you that there is still room for improvement in Pep Guardiola's brilliant team.