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The trivial experience of every day is always verifying some old prediction to us and converting into things the words and signs which we had heard and seen without heed.
Every thing the individual sees without him corresponds to his states of mind, and every thing is in turn intelligible to him, as his onward thinking leads him into the truth to which that fact or series belongs.
What but this, that every man passes personally through a Grecian period.
The attraction of these manners is that they belong to man, and are known to every man in virtue of his being once a child; besides that there are always individuals who retain these characteristics.
As they come to revere their intuitions and aspire to live holily, their own piety explains every fact, every word.
The fact teaches him how Belus was worshipped and how the Pyramids were built, better than the discovery by Champollion of the names of all the workmen and the cost of every tile.
One after another he comes up in his private adventures with every fable of Aesop, of Homer, of Hafiz, of Ariosto, of Chaucer, of Scott, and verifies them with his own head and hands.
Antaeus was suffocated by the gripe of Hercules, but every time he touched his mother earth his strength was renewed.
See in Goethe's Helena the same desire that every word should be a thing.
In old Rome the public roads beginning at the Forum proceeded north, south, east, west, to the centre of every province of the empire, making each market-town of Persia, Spain and Britain pervious to the soldiers of the capital: so out of the human heart go as it were highways to the heart of every object in nature, to reduce it under the dominion of man.
It shall walk incarnate in every just and wise man.
Yet every history should be written in a wisdom which divined the range of our affinities and looked at facts as symbols.
No sentence will hold the whole truth, and the only way in which we can be just, is by giving ourselves the lie; Speech is better than silence; silence is better than speech;--All things are in contact; every atom has a sphere of repulsion;--Things are, and are not, at the same time;--and the like.
Is it that every man believes every other to be an incurable partialist, and himself a universalist?
In fine, the world would have seen, for the first time, a system of government founded on an inversion of the fundamental principles of all government; it would have seen the authority of the whole society every where subordinate to the authority of the parts; it would have seen a monster, in which the head was under the direction of the members.