et tu, Brute!

(redirected from et tu Brute)

et tu, Brute!

You, my so-called friend, are also betraying me. This expression is generally credited to Shakespeare, who used the exact Latin locution (literally, “and you, Brutus”) in Julius Caesar (3.1) in 1599. However, Shakespeare actually was loosely quoting the real Julius Caesar, who reportedly said, “You too, my child?” when Marcus Brutus stabbed him in 44 b.c. Caesar made this dying remark in Greek (according to Suetonius’s account). Incidentally, “Brute” did not signify “brute” in the sense of animal; it simply is the proper Latin case for this name. A more recent version, with friends like that/you, who needs enemies, became current in America in the 1960s. It usually is a response to a far less dire betrayal—a tactless remark by a friend, for example.
See also: ET
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
The head looks a sort of reproachfully at him, with an Et tu Brute! expression.
Et tu Brute? Unfortunately, I do not live in his electoral division so I won't be able to vote for him, but I wish Coun Malcolm well.
Birmingham Council Leader Mike Whitby was in high spirits yesterday, but will it be a case of "et tu Brute" for him?
Sebastian Deeth, aged three, from Lydney in Gloucestershire; ET TU BRUTE: Oliver George from Coventry wearing armour he bought from the sale PICTURES BY MARC KIRSTEN; SHAKESPEARE LOVERS: Lisa Clifford, from Kenilworth, and Isabella Hughes aged two from Kidderminster joined the crowds at the sell-off
ET tu Brute! Or should that be Birmingham City manager Steve Bruce?
A member of the audience gave a sly chuckle, and I am sure I heard the words "Et tu Brute." This quote from Julius Caesar will be familiar to those who had Shakespeare pumped down them at school.
On "The Ides of March," as my Morton East High School sophomore English students and I study the play, Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare, we investigate a certain harmful condition of the human mind that I have entitled "The Et Tu Brute Complex." On March 15, the date of the "Ides of March," Caesar's friend, Brutus, stabs him, which prompts Caesar to exclaim with his last breath, "Et Tu Brute?"("And you, too, Brutus?") Caesar is surprised that Brutus is among the senators in the Roman Forum who are stabbing him.
More specifically, "The Et Tu Brute Complex" occurs when a person, instead of supporting and befriending himself, orally condemns himself in front of other people and becomes his own worst enemy.
After this initial explanation of "The Et Tu Brute Complex," I take the lesson to a second stage.
Individuals who suffer from the "Et Tu Brute Complex" do not fortify their identities but renounce their existence in a powerful display of low self-concept, self-contempt and self-hatred, as if their lives are not worth living or pursuing.
After presenting these three characters from the literature who exemplify "The Et Tu Brute Complex," I move to the third stage of the lesson.
I should have left it alone, but, instead, I fell victim to "The Et Tu Brute Complex." Instead of keeping it to myself, I told Rob that I had completely forgotten him the day of the raft-ride and, in my fear, disregarded him.
Having heard about Sydney Carton, Jay Gatsby, Dolphus Raymond and me, their teacher, my students do not feel alone when they share with the class their own examples of "The Et Tu Brute Complex." They know that they are not the only ones with this problem, and, therefore, they feel less defensive about sharing their problems with the class.
Which Roman emperor was said to say 'et tu brute' as he died?
THE city that gave us Et Tu Brute got a re-written Scots version last night - "Eh ...