escape

(redirected from escaped)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

escape fire

1. A fire created in an area of vegetation so as to create a path clear of fuel to avoid an oncoming wildfire. A lighter might seem like the last thing you'd need in the middle of a grasslands wildfire, but it saved my life when I used it to start an escape fire.
2. By extension, any nonstandard, counterintuitive, and/or improvised solution to a problem that is too large or complex to be dealt with by traditional means. The country's welfare debt was so insurmountable that the government began looking at radical escape fires to manage the situation.
See also: escape, fire

escape the bear and fall to the lion

To avoid a frightening or problematic situation, only to end up in a worse one later. A: "After I swerved to avoid hitting a pedestrian, I wound up in oncoming traffic, and my car was totaled." B: "That's awful. You escaped the bear and fell to the lion."
See also: and, bear, escape, fall, lion

narrow escape

A situation in which danger or problems are barely avoided. That guy barely made it over the tracks before the train came. What a narrow escape!
See also: escape, narrow

avenue of escape

A way or path out of something. That beetle doesn't seem to know that his only avenue of escape is the open window. The fire was in the kitchen, so our only avenue of escape was through the front door.
See also: avenue, escape, of

escape (one's) notice

To avoid being seen. I doubt you will escape people's notice if you show up at the party in a floor-length sequined gown.
See also: escape, notice

it escapes (one)

One can't quite remember something at the moment. I'm trying to remember why I came in here, but it escapes me.
See also: escape

make good (one's) escape

To successfully escape from some place. The robber made good his escape through a secret back door in the building that was unknown to police.
See also: escape, good, make

Little thieves are hanged, but great ones escape.

Those who commit small crimes will face the full consequences of the law, but those who commit crimes on a huge scale will go unpunished. So some guy who holds up a liquor store with a gun because his family can't afford food gets 30 years in prison, but a wealthy CEO who robs millions of people of their pensions gets a few months of community service? I tell you, little thieves are hanged, but great ones escape.
See also: but, great, little, one, thief

avenue of escape

Fig. the pathway or route along which someone or something escapes. The open window was the bird's only avenue of escape from the house. Bill saw that his one avenue of escape was through the back door.
See also: avenue, escape, of

by the skin of one's teeth

Fig. just barely. (By an amount equal to the thickness of the (imaginary) skin on one's teeth.) I got through calculus class by the skin of my teeth. I got to the airport a few minutes late and missed the plane by the skin of my teeth. Lloyd escaped from the burning building by the skin of his teeth.
See also: by, of, skin, teeth

escape (from someone or something) (to some place)

to get away from someone, something, or some place to another place. Max escaped from prison to a hideout in Alabama. He escaped to Alabama from one of the worst-run prisons in the land.

escape someone's notice

Fig. to go unnoticed; not to have been noticed. (Usually a way to point out that someone has failed to see or respond to something.) I suppose my earlier request escaped your notice, so I'm writing again. I'm sorry. Your letter escaped my notice.
See also: escape, notice

Little thieves are hanged, but great ones escape.

Prov. Truly expert criminals are never caught. Everyone's making such a fuss because they convicted that bank robber, but he must not have been a very dangerous criminal. Little thieves are hanged, but great ones escape.
See also: but, escape, great, little, one, thief

escape notice

Elude attention or observation, as in It must have escaped the editor's notice so I'll write again. [c. 1700]
See also: escape, notice

narrow escape

A barely successful flight from or avoidance of danger or trouble, as in He had a narrow escape, since the bullet came within inches of his head. This expression uses narrow in the sense of "barely sufficient." [Late 1500s] For a newer synonym, see close call.
See also: escape, narrow

escape somebody’s ˈnotice

not be noticed by somebody: It may have escaped your notice but I’m very busy right now. Can we talk later?
See also: escape, notice

make ˌgood your eˈscape

(written) manage to escape completely: In the confusion at the border, the woman made good her escape.He made good his escape from a crowd of journalists by jumping over a fence.
See also: escape, good, make

a narrow eˈscape/ˈsqueak

a situation where somebody only just avoids injury, danger or failure: We had a narrow escape on the way here. The wind blew a tree down just in front of us. We could have been killed.
See also: escape, narrow, squeak

by the skin of (one's) teeth

By the smallest margin.
See also: by, of, skin, teeth
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sunday Nation's analysis shows that most of the prisoners who escaped from their cells either did so by cutting the ventilation chutes, or by digging through the prison walls.
A photo of a post of one Facebook user also went viral on social media saying one of the escaped inmates came knocking at their door in Barangay Talaba 4 and asking for help for his dead child.
On Saturday, May 19, at around 6.20pm, three other suspects also escaped from Wajir police station.
MTV television station reported that the inmates may have escaped around a month ago and their disappearance was only discovered when prison guards went looking for one man to go to his court date.
On March 23, 2012, some 19 inmates held on terrorism charges escaped from Tasfirat Central Prison of Kirkuk, according to Torhan Abdurrahman Youssef, Kirkuk Deputy Police Chief Major-General.
The first inmate was arrested two days after the two escaped, while the second was arrested on Tuesday.
They excavated for the first time the remains of 'George', a tunnel that was in progress when the war ended, and the famous 'Harry' tunnel from which the Allied airmen escaped on March 24, 1944.
FIVE prisoners escaped a high-security Lebanese prison yesterday by scaling down the building's walls with bed sheets.
Dhuor explained that the man escaped the prison before the security guards were aware of the brake out.
A comprehensive reshuffle of prison security officials was ordered last month by Interior Minister Ziad Baroud after eight Fatah-Islam members briefly escaped from prison.
Two of Greece's most notorious criminals escaped from Athens' maximum security prison in a helicopter - for the second time in three years, Greek media has reported.
1 : to get away : get free or clear <Everyone escaped from the burning building.>
In FIGURE 4, the connections in the center of the BGA were escaped in the direction of the netline.
* Individuals, groups, and institutions: How two people escaped from slavery.