escape

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Related to escapable: inescapable

escape fire

1. A fire created in an area of vegetation so as to create a path clear of fuel to avoid an oncoming wildfire. A lighter might seem like the last thing you'd need in the middle of a grasslands wildfire, but it saved my life when I used it to start an escape fire.
2. By extension, any nonstandard, counterintuitive, and/or improvised solution to a problem that is too large or complex to be dealt with by traditional means. The country's welfare debt was so insurmountable that the government began looking at radical escape fires to manage the situation.
See also: escape, fire

escape the bear and fall to the lion

To avoid a frightening or problematic situation, only to end up in a worse one later. A: "After I swerved to avoid hitting a pedestrian, I wound up in oncoming traffic, and my car was totaled." B: "That's awful. You escaped the bear and fell to the lion."
See also: and, bear, escape, fall, lion

narrow escape

A situation in which danger or problems are barely avoided. That guy barely made it over the tracks before the train came. What a narrow escape!
See also: escape, narrow

avenue of escape

A way or path out of something. That beetle doesn't seem to know that his only avenue of escape is the open window. The fire was in the kitchen, so our only avenue of escape was through the front door.
See also: avenue, escape, of

escape (one's) notice

To avoid being seen. I doubt you will escape people's notice if you show up at the party in a floor-length sequined gown.
See also: escape, notice

it escapes (one)

One can't quite remember something at the moment. I'm trying to remember why I came in here, but it escapes me.
See also: escape

make good (one's) escape

To successfully escape from some place. The armed robber made good his escape through a secret back door in the building that was unknown to police.
See also: escape, good, make

avenue of escape

Fig. the pathway or route along which someone or something escapes. The open window was the bird's only avenue of escape from the house. Bill saw that his one avenue of escape was through the back door.
See also: avenue, escape, of

by the skin of one's teeth

Fig. just barely. (By an amount equal to the thickness of the (imaginary) skin on one's teeth.) I got through calculus class by the skin of my teeth. I got to the airport a few minutes late and missed the plane by the skin of my teeth. Lloyd escaped from the burning building by the skin of his teeth.
See also: by, of, skin, teeth

escape (from someone or something) (to some place)

to get away from someone, something, or some place to another place. Max escaped from prison to a hideout in Alabama. He escaped to Alabama from one of the worst-run prisons in the land.

escape someone's notice

Fig. to go unnoticed; not to have been noticed. (Usually a way to point out that someone has failed to see or respond to something.) I suppose my earlier request escaped your notice, so I'm writing again. I'm sorry. Your letter escaped my notice.
See also: escape, notice

Little thieves are hanged, but great ones escape.

Prov. Truly expert criminals are never caught. Everyone's making such a fuss because they convicted that bank robber, but he must not have been a very dangerous criminal. Little thieves are hanged, but great ones escape.
See also: but, escape, great, little, one, thief

escape notice

Elude attention or observation, as in It must have escaped the editor's notice so I'll write again. [c. 1700]
See also: escape, notice

narrow escape

A barely successful flight from or avoidance of danger or trouble, as in He had a narrow escape, since the bullet came within inches of his head. This expression uses narrow in the sense of "barely sufficient." [Late 1500s] For a newer synonym, see close call.
See also: escape, narrow

escape somebody’s ˈnotice

not be noticed by somebody: It may have escaped your notice but I’m very busy right now. Can we talk later?
See also: escape, notice

make ˌgood your eˈscape

(written) manage to escape completely: In the confusion at the border, the woman made good her escape.He made good his escape from a crowd of journalists by jumping over a fence.
See also: escape, good, make

a narrow eˈscape/ˈsqueak

a situation where somebody only just avoids injury, danger or failure: We had a narrow escape on the way here. The wind blew a tree down just in front of us. We could have been killed.
See also: escape, narrow, squeak

by the skin of (one's) teeth

By the smallest margin.
See also: by, of, skin, teeth
References in periodicals archive ?
Coping and immunosuppression: Inescapable but not escapable shock suppresses lymphocyte proliferation.
However, bidders may include components in the EPP and the CPP, which are escapable for Pakistan rupee inflation.
By unt hinkingly giving normative effect to professional standards as more than default rules escapable by contract, the law has prevented the health care revolution from liberating consumers from the dictates of a professional monopoly.
There would be no such luck for the injured of sea-girt Manhattan, escapable only by a few bridges and tunnels.
Chairman Labour MP Tony Wright said: "Some form of patronage is an escapable part of public life.
Without faith in the descent, Christians might live as if death were somehow escapable or as if death were indeed the price one pays for a life of sin, as if death were an existence apart from God's love and life.
Regurgitating and reacting to the material of his youth impels Paizs's work; his ambivalence comes with the predictable refusal to see this all-encompassing alien world as something escapable.
Once the definitions are founded on what is" 'natural to a thing,' "they are not alienable, transformable, or escapable.
Though modernity told us that history is escapable, and that time and space are linear constructions, individuals have never been able to anticipate the future without selectively altering their conceptions of the past.
Making full allowance for the fact that the images associated with the different sensations vary according to culture (Schulman 1979:40), it seems to me an escapable conclusion of my own material that underlying such variation the same mental or thought processes are at work; in a word, we are at play in the fields of the unconscious.
These costs are avoidable or escapable if the program is dropped.
In a fundamental sense, none of this is escapable although to an extent it may be "contained" (or "defended against") in various ways through the maneuvers of repetition compulsion, maneuvers which establish the structuring of narration against the inevitability of absencing, inherent contradictoriness, kinesis, and "deathfulness" (cf.
Many of the foods, drugs, or animals that cause allergies can be avoided to a great extent; even insects and household dust are escapable.