erotic dancer

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erotic dancer

Someone who dances seductively for an audience while wearing little or no clothing. Please tell me you didn't go see erotic dancers during your bachelor party.
See also: dancer
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

erotic dancer

n. a dancer, typically female, who performs teasing and sexually stimulating dances, usually on a stage. She was a school teacher by day and an erotic dancer by night.
See also: dancer
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The variety of meanings that comprise the erotic experience of women is loosely organized by Shomer into three sections.
These are the very questions motivating black queer Barbadian American anthropologist Jafari Allen's conceptualization and hermeneutic deployment of a "politics of erotic transcendence" in his lyrical ethnography !Venceremos?
Cylinder seals small cylinder-shaped stones etched with figures and cuneiform used as a signet occasionally featured men and women in erotic poses.
With The Erotics of Sovereignty, Mark Rifkin, who is fast becoming one of the foremost scholars in queer Native studies, puts out his third monograph and his second that engages the texts and theories of Two-Spirit literatures.
Ironically, one of the books being discussed is In Too Deep, the story of a young librarian who finds increasingly erotic love notes to her in the suggestion box at work.
Although Dreyfus claims to be doing something new by exploring Wagner's erotics (a topic that will necessarily place Tristan in the forefront), he neglects to take note of two important predecessors in the musicological literature that deal with Tristan, the erotic, and Schopenhauer: Roger Sermon's Death-Devoted Heart: Sex and Sacred in Wagner's "'Tristan and Isolde" (Oxford University Press, 2003) and Eric Chafe's The Tragic and the Ecstatic: The Musical Revolution of Wagner's "Tristan und Isolde" (Oxford University Press, 2005).
In the first chapter, "Echoes," Dreyfus lays the groundwork for his study of Wagner's musical erotics. He expresses frustration with the idea that erotic experiences may have changed too much for scholars to draw reliable conclusions about the representation of sex at different points in history (an idea he attributes to Jeffrey Kallberg's article on sexuality in New Grove).
This book offers a kaleidoscopic view of the vast Italian Renaissance erotic world: as with the famous cylinder, one can rotate the book and see history of art, culture and literature mix together in a captivating multicolored fresco.
Erotic triangles is a brave, surprising, and thought-provoking addition to the ethnographic literature on Southeast Asian performing arts.
Renowned works of Bulgarian poets and writers, which contain strong erotic elements have also been cited in the book.
But just for fun, poets are invited to perform erotic, lusty, lascivious, luscious and romantic poems, a news release says.
He decided to write a book instead which would feature photographs of his collection of erotic objects, with notes by the doctor- turned- author.
Because it's live--because its essence is the interaction of the actor's body and the spectator's consciousness--theatre is potentially the most erotic of the arts.
Of the intersection of jazz music, history, and the erotic, Toni Morrison states: