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all else being equal

When external circumstances or factors do not or will not affect the outcome or decision of something at hand. All else being equal, I don't see our relationship continuing for much longer.
See also: all, being, else, equal

equal to the occasion

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the occasion and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the occasion?
See also: equal, occasion

equal to the task

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the task and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the task?
See also: equal, task

in some measure

To a certain degree or extent; somewhat. While hard work and perseverance will take you far, success also depends in some measure on good fortune.
See also: measure

all things being equal

In the event that all aspects of a situation remain the same. Now, I know there are a lot of risks involved, but, all things being equal, I think we should still move ahead with the deal. Alexis is really nervous about committing to a mortgage, but, all things being equal, it will prove to be a great investment.
See also: all, being, equal, thing

be first among equals

To be more important or renowned than one's peers. Riley is the best choice for that difficult project—she's first among equals.
See also: among, equal, first

equal in (someone or something)

The same as someone or something in a particular way. A noun or pronoun can be used between "equal" and "in." The twins may be equal in stature, but Erin has a much more flamboyant personality than Caitlin. My idea equals anyone else's in merit, and I am determined to present it to the mayor herself.
See also: equal

equal to (someone or something)

1. As skilled or accomplished as someone or something else. I don't understand why I didn't get the promotion when I am certainly equal to Greg in every way.
2. Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the task and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush.
See also: equal

first among equals

More important or renowned than one's peers. Riley is the best choice for that difficult project—she's first among equals.
See also: among, equal, first

other things being equal

In the event that all aspects of a situation remain the same. Now, I know there are a lot of risks involved, but, other things being equal, I think we should still move ahead with the deal. Alexis is really nervous about committing to a mortgage, but, other things being equal, it will prove to be a great investment.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

be without equal

To be superior to others of one's or its kind. As a lawyer, Janice is truly without equal. The reigning Super Bowl champions continue to play as if they're without equal. The newest car from Ferrari is without equal.
See also: equal, without

in equal measure(s)

To an equal degree or extent; in an equal amount or portion. We've worked in equal measure with law enforcement and mental health professionals to tackle the issue. Now, now—blame must be shared in equal measures for this.
See also: equal

on equal terms

With or having no difference in position or advantage. I find couple's therapy to be helpful because it gives each partner a chance to air their frustrations in an environment where they are on equal terms. We do everything in our power to ensure that every athlete is able to compete on equal terms in our tournament.
See also: equal, on, term

some are more equal than others

Some types of people are treated more favorably or preferably than others, despite an appearance of equality. A noun can be used after "some" to specify the type of person being described. The idea is that everyone's point of view is equally valid, but in the mainstream media, some are more equal than others. The tax code is constructed in such a way that some taxpayers are more equal than others.
See also: equal, more, other

separate but equal

Referring to a doctrine or policy holding that two or more groups may be segregated so long as they have the same kinds of resources, facilities, and opportunities. This was once a prevalent and legally protected policy regarding the status of African-American citizens in the United States following the abolition of slavery until the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In the case of African Americans, as in most other instances of such a policy, such facilities and opportunities were separate but rarely truly equal. Sometimes hyphenated if used before a noun. Separate but equal is a contradiction in terms—if people are forced to be separate, they can never truly be equal.
See also: but, equal, separate

equal someone or something in something

to be even or identical with someone or something in something. John equals Bill in strength and size, I think. This cake equals that one in texture but not in richness.
See also: equal

equal to

someone as good or as accomplished as someone else. I certainly feel equal to Randy. He's nothing special. I don't think that Bill feels equal to Bob, even though they are twins.
See also: equal

equal to

(someone or something) able to handle or deal with someone or something. I'm afraid that I'm not equal to Mrs. Smith's problem right now. Please ask her to come back later. That's a very difficult task, but I'm sure Bill is equal to it.
See also: equal

other things being equal

 and all things being equal
Cliché if things stay the way they are now; if there are no complications from other factors. Other things being equal, we should have no trouble getting your order to you on time. I anticipate no problems, all things being equal.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

separate but equal

segregated but of equal value or quality. (A doctrine once sanctioned by the U.S. Supreme Court regarding racial segregation.) The separate but equal doctrine was abandoned years ago. They were provided with facilities that were said to be separate but equalbut were really of a lower standard.
See also: but, equal, separate

equal to

Adequate or fit in ability or extent, as in I'm not sure I'm equal to the task. [Late 1600s] Also see feel up to; up to.
See also: equal

in some measure

Somewhat, to a certain extent, as in In some measure we owe these privileges to our parents. Shakespeare used this term in A Midsummer Night's Dream (1:2): "I will condole in some measure." Similarly, in large measure, dating from the same period, means "to a considerable extent," as in In large measure the two sides agree. [c. 1600]
See also: measure

other things being equal

Also, all else being equal. Given the same circumstances, as in Other things being equal, I prefer the green sofa. This term is a translation of the Latin phrase ceteris paribus, which was widely used until the 18th century, when it began to be replaced by the English equivalent.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

separate but equal

Relating to or affected by a policy whereby two groups may be segregated if they are given equal facilities and opportunities. For example, They've divided up the physical education budget so that the girls' teams are separate but equal to the boys . This idiom comes from a Louisiana law of 1890, upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson, "requiring all railway companies carrying passengers on their trains in this state, to provide equal but separate accommodations for the white and colored races." Subsequently it was widely used to separate African-Americans from the white population through a general policy of racial segregation. In 1954, in a unanimous ruling to end school segregation, the Supreme Court finally overturned the law (in Brown v. Board of Education).
See also: but, equal, separate

first among equals

the person or thing having the highest status in a group.
This expression is a translation of the Latin phrase primus inter pares , which is also used in English.
See also: among, equal, first

other (or all) things being equal

provided that other factors or circumstances remain the same.
1996 E. D. Hirsch Jr. Schools We Need Other things being equal, students from good-home schools will always have an educational advantage over students from less-good-home schools.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

be without ˈequal

,

have no ˈequal

(formal) be better than anything else or anyone else of the same type: He was a violinist without equal.
See also: equal, without

on equal ˈterms (with somebody/something)

,

on the same ˈterms (as somebody/something)

with no difference or advantage over another person; as equals: We’re not competing on equal terms; the other team has one more player.A good teacher should treat all her students on the same terms.
See also: equal, on, term

ˌsome (people, members, etc.) are more equal than ˈothers

(saying) although the members of a society, group, etc. appear to be equal, some get better treatment than othersThis phrase is used by one of the pigs in the book Animal Farm by George Orwell: ‘All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.’
See also: equal, more, other

ˌfirst among ˈequals

the person or thing with the highest status in a group: Our history classes were usually open discussion-groups between us and our teacher, with the teacher as first among equals.
See also: among, equal, first

in some, equal, etc. ˈmeasure

(formal) to some, etc. extent or degree: The introduction of a new tax accounted in some measure for the downfall of the government.Our thanks are due in equal measure to every member of the team.
See also: measure

other/all things being ˈequal

if nothing else changes; if other conditions remain the same: Other things being equal, prices will rise if people’s incomes rise.
See also: all, being, equal, other, thing

all other things (else) being equal

Given the same circumstances. This term began as the Latin phrase ceteris paribus; sometimes the word all is omitted, and else is substituted for other things. Eric Partridge held that the Latin form was already a cliché in the eighteenth century, and the English form became one in the late nineteenth century. Thomas Babington Macaulay was among the many learned writers who used it (although slightly differently) in his History of England (1849–61): “All other circumstances being supposed equal . . .”
See also: all, being, equal, other, thing

other things being equal

See all other things being equal.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

separate but equal

The doctrine that similar facilities for different groups justifies separating them from one another. This phrase became widely known through a Supreme Court decision of 1896 in the case of Plessy v. Ferguson. Justice Henry B. Brown, speaking for the majority of the court, found that “separate but equal accommodations” for African Americans and whites satisfied the Fourteenth Amendment, which had been invoked by the plaintiff. The doctrine, which marked the low point of American race relations following the Civil War, was reversed in 1954 in several decisions by the Supreme Court, at that time led by Chief Justice Earl Warren. The most important of these decisions held that “separate but equal” has no place in public education, and that so-called separate but equal facilities are inherently unequal. Despite its close associations with the civil rights movement, the phrase was invoked in other contexts as well, such as gender discrimination (“Girls can’t play on the baseball team but they have their own softball team—separate but equal”).
See also: but, equal, separate
References in periodicals archive ?
The lucky winners of the Salary Transfer Monthly Draws will receive a total of RO5,000, distributed equally between ten winners each month.
Councillor Hina Khan, who was elected on a special seat, praised the nazim for treating all members of the house equally.
"It shows that women did not expect their husbands to share the housework equally from the beginning; their expectations were low, so they thought they were sharing it equally despite the time spending gap between them," the report said.
Joining the Equally Well collaborative takes our work in the area of physical health to a new level, and allows us share expertise with a number of organisations from across the UK.
Now, as part of its latest update, Twitter announced through its developer forum that it will count all emoji equally, including the ones with gender and skin tone modifiers, leaving room for users to express more liberally.
Critique: Absolutely 'user friendly' in tone, commentary, organization and presentation, "Equally Wed: The Ultimate Guide to Planning Your LGBTQ+ Wedding" is inspired and inspiring, and fills an urgent need now that same-sex marriage is now legal in every state of the union.
Meanwhile, Pakistan said that its sincerity in the fight against terrorism should not doubted and that it treats all terrorists equally.
Since its inception five years ago, Equally Wed magazine has witnessed tremendous growth in the U.S.
The first part of Equally Well, an evidence review, has been completed.
28 May 2014 -- US exchange and clearing house operator IntercontinentalExchange Group (NYSE: ICE) said that its Liffe unit will introduce futures based on the FTSE 100 Equally Weighted Net Total Return Index.
M2 EQUITYBITES-May 28, 2014--Liffe to Launch FTSE 100 equally weighted index futures
In the movie "Two Weeks," I can't forget what Sally Field told her children-"I cannot love you equally, but I can love you specially." She said this when asked who among her four children she loved most.
Damascus, (SANA)- Syria won first position equally with Egypt in the competition "Leaders of Small and Medium Industrial Enterprises" in Cairo, Tishrin daily reported on Saturday.
If you passed a framing shop in Ludlow or Leamington, there in the windows would be works by local elderly ladies depicting equally boring subjects, equally badly painted.