entitle (one) to (do something)

(redirected from entitle us to)

entitle (one) to (do something)

To allow or authorize someone to do something. That pass entitles us to go backstage and meet the band. Good news—this coupon entitles you to save 20% on your entire purchase!
See also: entitle

entitle someone to do something

[for something] to qualify someone to do something. This ticket entitles you to go in and take a seat. Does this paper entitle me to get a discount?
See also: entitle
References in periodicals archive ?
So, my ambition is to win another election in 2020 with a result that will entitle us to form another government.
"The elections entitle us to run the country's affairs, but not to strip people of their rights," he said.
It will be a nasty shock for some people, but I don't think we shall be able to pay for all the clothes the coupons will entitle us to buy.
Just because our mind is too small to comprehend him does not entitle us to deny him.
She added: "Most of us meet at the start as we are now given blue and white striped numbers which entitle us to start at the front if we wish.
As a joint group it should entitle us to some dedicated officer support.
"The conditions of entry for spectators are clearly stated in our ticketing terms and conditions and entitle us to prohibit items from being brought into venues and to remove persons from venues where necessary," noted a London 2012 spokesman.
reparations for damage done to British interests the China prior to the outbreak of war with Japan) use the argument that the Burmese and Swiss agreement would legally entitle us to make further reparation claims.
"This acquisition not only will entitle us to ready shelf space with leading retailers like Walmart, Walgreens, CVS and Rite Aid but also will be instrumental in establishing our presence in the U.S.
The recent release of CIA memos regarding the use of torture, in particular waterboarding, have been a grim reminder of the legacy of the Bush era, a legacy that, as President Barack Obama noted in his inaugural address, compromised America's principles and values in the name of security: "our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please".
Again marking his difference from the neocon days of Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld, he underlined that earlier generations had "understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please.
"They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please," he said.
Bush, suggested higher moral standards, such as the principle that being a great power "does not entitle us to do as we please." He called for "humility and restraint" in dealings with foreign powers.
He said "our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please."
He added: "They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please...