enter in(to) (something)

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enter in(to) (something)

1. To move into something. Once you enter into the parking garage, turn left.
2. To agree to something, such as a contract. It is common law that those who enter into a written agreement must adhere to the terms contained therein.
3. To sign up or enlist for something. I'm a pretty good singer, so I'm definitely entering in the talent show this year.
4. To sign someone else up for something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "enter" and "in" or "into." I'm definitely entering Sasha into the talent show this year. She may be shy, but she's a great singer.
5. To become a part of or factor in something. Once my uncle's shortcomings entered into the dinner conversation, I knew that a fight was inevitable. If Mom and Dad think that alcohol will enter into the equation, they definitely won't let you go to that party.
6. To join or begin to participate in something. Did you hear that Jody is entering into med school in the fall?
See also: enter

enter someone or something in(to) something

to enroll someone or something in something; to make someone or something a competitor in something. I will enter you into the contest whether you like it or not. The trainer entered his fastest horse in the race.
See also: enter

enter in something

to enroll as a participant in something, such as a contest, competition, etc. She was not ready to enter in the competition. I can't enter in that contest. I'm not prepared.
See also: enter

enter into something

 
1. . Lit. to get into something. She entered into the house and immediately went to work. As the people entered into the cathedral, they became quiet.
2. Fig. to join in something; to participate in something. I couldn't get him to enter into the spirit of the party. She just loves to enter into things and have a good time with people.
See also: enter

enter into

1. Participate in, take an active role or interest in, as in We had to think twice before we entered into these negotiations. [Late 1700s]
2. Become party to (a contract), bind oneself, as in The nations entered into a new agreement. [First half of 1500s]
3. Become a component, form a part of, as in Finances soon entered into the discussion. [Early 1700s]
4. Also, go into. Consider, investigate, as in The report entered into the effect of high interest rates, or Let's not go into that. [Mid-1500s]
See also: enter

enter into

v.
1. To participate or take an active interest in something: After college, she entered into politics. The union and management have decided to enter into negotiations in order to settle the strike.
2. To enroll or register someone or something in some activity: I'm going to enter my dog into the competition.
3. To become party to a contract: The nations entered into a trade agreement.
4. To become a part of something: Financial matters entered into the discussion.
See also: enter
References in periodicals archive ?
Enters into a futures or forward contract to deliver the same or substantially identical property;
Enters into a short sale, an offsetting notional principal contract or forward or futures contract and subsequently acquires a long position in the same property; or
To the extent prescribed in regulations, enters into other transactions with substantially the same effect as the above transactions.
A "short sale against the box" occurs when a shareholder owns a particular stock and enters into a short sale with respect to borrowed shares of the same stock.
Further, if an investor enters into a short sale against the box and dies: before the short sale is closed, any gain inherent in the stock used to close the short sale may be completely eliminated.
treaty for 1995, until the new U.S.-Kazakhstan treaty enters into force.
1.1221-2(b) defines hedging transactions as transactions that the taxpayer enters into in the normal course of its trade or business (1) for the purpose of reducing the risk of price changes or currency fluctuations with respect to ordinary property held or to be held by the taxpayer or (2) to reduce the risk of interest rate, price or currency fluctuations with respect to borrowings made or to be made, or ordinary obligations incurred or to be incurred.(9) Thus, the IRS has reversed its position, taken in FNMA, that hedging transactions related to borrowings cannot be ordinary because a liability, rather than an asset, is being hedged.
It is irrelevant how frequently the taxpayer enters into and terminates positions, even if done on a daily or more frequent basis.