energy

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Related to energies: Renewable energies

a waste of energy

A useless, vain, or redundant effort or action. It turns out the boss had already chosen a direction for the project, so my presentation was a complete waste of energy.
See also: energy, of, waste

big dick energy

vulgar slang Confidence and self-assuredness, especially when exuded in a calm or quiet manner. Although the term alludes to the confidence that may result from having a large penis, the phrase is not necessarily literal and is not exclusively applied to men. Commonly abbreviated with the initialism "BDE." John is a guy who has the confidence to show his emotions without hesitation or embarrassment—that's total big dick energy, if you ask me. A: "I can't believe you were able to negotiate such a big raise. You've got some serious big dick energy, girl." B: "What? I just know I'm worth more than they were paying me."
See also: big, dick, energy

brown energy

Energy that is derived from traditional resources, such as coal, oil, natural gas, and nuclear power, which are seen by some as environmentally unfriendly. If we're going to keep our planet clean, we need to move away from brown energy and invest in renewable resources, such as wind and solar.
See also: brown, energy

bundle of energy

Someone who is exceptionally energetic, alert, productive, or hyperactive. My kids are always such bundles of energy first thing in the morning. Susan is a bundle of energy! She's already finished two of her essays today and is beginning to work on a third.
See also: bundle, energy, of

throw away on (someone or something)

To waste, squander, or misuse something because of or for the benefit of someone or something. A noun or pronoun is used either before or after "away." No wonder you don't have any savings—you keep throwing it away on junk you don't need! I can't believe I threw my youth away on such an unfulfilling job. Don't throw your time and effort away on people who don't appreciate your efforts.
See also: away, on, throw

unavailable energy

In science, energy converted into a form that is unavailable for work. Today, we'll be studying the unavailable energy in this system.
See also: energy
References in periodicals archive ?
However, at the relatively low energies of solar photons, subtleties related to electron motion largely prevent the exciton-to-electron energy transfers, so only negligible impact ionization occurs, Nozik notes.
About a decade ago, Nozik began to suspect that the smallness of quantum dots might make impact ionization a fruitful process at solar-radiation energies. For example, he figured that a dot's grip on an electron would nullify the motion-related subtleties that squelched the process at larger scales.
The combination of a light leak in the detector and backscattered electron energies deposited in a particular veto detector indicate 90% to 96% detection efficiency of backscattered electrons--enough to allow a 0.5% measurement in little "a".
Activation energies for both CPE and CSM agree well with those previously determined by other methods (117 kJ/mol for CPE and 88kJ/mol for CSM) (refs.
Scofield (10) has tabulated K and L shell ionization cross sections for a selection of elements at relativistic energies that are above the energies used in microanalysis.
Consequently, contributions of gravitational energies to accelerations of Earth and the moon, while not directly tested, must also be equal, albeit to lesser precision.
The researchers used a computer program to identify individual sound pulses, measuring the energy of each pop and plotting the number of pulses detected at different energies. "Some of the crackles were small, and some of them were large, covering a wide range of energies," Sethna says.
Using two ground-based Fly's Eye detectors to pick up the faint streaks created in the night sky by the passage of energetic cosmic rays plunging through Earth's atmosphere, researchers have now obtained the clearest evidence yet that cosmic rays of the highest energies detectable consist largely of protons that apparently originated outside the Milky Way.
At energies of up to 100 billion billion electron-volts, cosmic rays rain upon our planet from the depths of the Milky Way and from stars hundreds of thousands of light-years beyond.
As astronomers have pushed their techniques to higher and higher energies, they have discovered many interesting phenomena, some associated with objects already known and some related to objects found for the first time in the new energy range.
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