enemy combatant


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enemy combatant

A term, popularized during the post-9/11 War on Terror, applied to a captured fighter who was allowed fewer rights than those laid out in the Geneva Convention. Many of the enemy combatants captured in Afghanistan were taken to be held at special military sites.
See also: enemy
References in periodicals archive ?
The full term Graham is referencing is an unlawful enemy combatant.
The majority of the appellate panel avoided the constitutional question by finding that al-Marri did not meet the statutory definition as an alien who "has been determined by the United States to have been properly detained as an enemy combatant or is awaiting such determination," and was thus not barred from seeking habeas relief.
6) While some may argue that the fault for this obfuscation rests with the lack of international consensus on relevant standards that should be adopted to deal with international terrorism(7) in asymmetric warfare,(8) or that the Bush-created phrase War on Terror itself is horribly vague,(9) the root cause of this so-called conundrum actually centers around the unwillingness of the United States government to properly distinguish al-Qaeda unlawful enemy combatant terrorists from domestic jihadi terrorists.
Those who favor treating Abdulmutallab as an enemy combatant say that military interrogators might have extracted life-saving information from him.
Whatever else may be true or derivable from [section] 948d(a), it at least makes clear that being an alien unlawful enemy combatant brings one within the authority of military commissions in the war on terror.
Marshals as a "material witness" for a grand jury investigation, Padilla was determined to be an enemy combatant by the president; U.
The Enemy Combatant Cases decided by the Supreme Court, Rasul v.
Al-Marri was arrested by the FBI in connection with the attacks three months later, and was held in civilian custody for a year and a half before being designated an enemy combatant by the President on June 23, 2003.
Given the substantial overlap between the definitions of "enemy combatant" and "POW," a CSRT's affirmative enemy combatant determination actually supports a detainee's POW status.
citizen--an enemy combatant and to deprive that person of basic due process rights to challenge his or her detention in court.
He said, 'The president has declared your client an enemy combatant,'" Newman recalls.
Not surprisingly, enemy combatant detainees, through friends of court, soon filed petitions for writ of habeas corpus in federal court to review the legality of their detention as enemy combatants.
A soldier aims across the battlefield at an enemy combatant.
THE DAY THE Supreme Court handed down what have collectively become known as the enemy combatant cases--June 28, 2004--was both widely anticipated and widely received as a legal moment of truth for the Bush administration's war on terrorism.
Rumsfeld, (1) the United States Supreme Court held that a citizen detained by the Government as an enemy combatant is entitled under due process to a meaningful opportunity to contest the facts underlying his detention before a neutral decision-maker.