endure

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he that would have eggs must endure the cackling of hens

proverb If you want something desirable or appealing, you must endure the annoying or unpleasant things that accompany it. A: "I really want to start my own business, but I'm overwhelmed by all the small steps along the way." B: "Well, he that would have eggs must endure the cackling of hens."
See also: cackle, egg, endure, have, he, hen, must, of, that

more than (one) can endure

More unpleasant, painful, or offensive to the senses than one is able to tolerate. Sometimes used humorously or ironically. I'm sorry, but the stress of this job is more than I can endure. The ugliness of politics is more unpleasant than most people can endure. These reality TV shows are more awkward and embarrassing than my girlfriend can endure.
See also: can, endure, more

more than flesh and blood can bear

More unpleasant, painful, or offensive than one is able to tolerate. Sometimes used humorously or ironically. The mental and physical torture from insomnia is more than flesh and blood can bear. These reality TV shows are more cringeworthy than flesh and blood can bear.
See also: and, bear, blood, can, flesh, more

more than flesh and blood can endure

More unpleasant, painful, or offensive than one is able to tolerate. Sometimes used humorously or ironically. The mental and physical torture from insomnia is more than flesh and blood can endure. These reality TV shows are more cringeworthy than flesh and blood can endure.
See also: and, blood, can, endure, flesh, more

more than flesh and blood can stand

More unpleasant, painful, or offensive than one is able to tolerate. Sometimes used humorously or ironically. The mental and physical torture from insomnia is more than flesh and blood can stand. These reality TV shows are more cringeworthy than flesh and blood can stand.
See also: and, blood, can, flesh, more, stand

what can't be cured must be endured

proverb One must simply learn to live with that which one is not able to resolve or improve. A: "I'm just really sick of working in this job, but there are just no other suitable job prospects in this part of the country." B: "Well, then, it sounds like you need to just suck it up. What can't be cured must be endured."
See also: cure, endure, must, what
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

He that would have eggs must endure the cackling of hens.

Prov. You must be willing to endure unpleasant, irritating things in order to get what you want. Sue: I'm tired of working after school. All the customers at the store are so rude. Mother: But you wanted money to buy a car. He that would have eggs must endure the cackling of hens, dear.
See also: cackle, egg, endure, have, he, hen, must, of, that

What can't be cured must be endured.

Prov. If you cannot do anything about a problem, you will have to live with it. Alan: No matter what I do, I can't make the dog stop barking in the middle of the night. Jane: What can't be cured must be endured, then, I guess.
See also: cure, endure, must, what
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

more than flesh and blood can ˈstand, enˈdure, etc.

too painful or unpleasant to tolerate: Sometimes the pain is so bad that it is more than flesh and blood can stand.
See also: and, blood, can, flesh, more
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
(3) As the Servant, Jesus willingly endured suffering and made clear that he of his own free will had opened himself to violence and death (John 10:17-18; Isa 50:5-6).
One needs to remember that before his more celebrated American captivity, John Smith endured enslavement in Constantinople and told both tales in The True Travels, Adventures, and Observations of Captaine Iohn Smith in Europe, Asia, Africke, and America (1630).
You can park your car without charge, you can walk into the airport and someone might smile at you, there are no lineups for anything, security must be endured, but is not surly or invasive, and people generally seem to care that you have a positive experience.
Despite the great suffering she endured, Jane Poulson carried that cross with faith and with courage to the end.
"With the added significance this year, and the salute to those who endured the terror of September 11, I am sure that the spirit of all Americans will be lifted by this heartwarming and patriotic performance."
Though this discovery is not entirely new within the historical literature, the extent to which African customs and traditions endured among the slaves of Carter's Grove certainly seems to be persuasive.
The world notes the crises those millions have endured. As The New York Times put it about a week after the election, there were "homeland coups, a gun battle in the business district, fratricidal political violence, a state of emergency, an expose of police atrocities, car bombs - and that's just in the last six weeks."
Time and again, it reminds me that God, too, has known pain, the kind of pain that can't be transcended, that can only be endured.
It is a time of persecution, suffering, and weariness, and the servant is able to sustain the weary because he himself has endured insult and spitting.
The latter is a compelling bio about Wang's grandmother, who endured forced marriage and racism to immigrate from China.
Roiphe writes in lyrical terms from the emotional heart of marriage, drawing from the miserable marriage of her parents, her own unhappy first marriage, and then her present happy one, which has endured for 34 years.
For the 9,000 residents of Kirkland Lake, who endured a failed attempt at economic diversification by offering to recycle and store Toronto's garbage at the abandoned Adams mine, it has been a much needed consolation says Kirkland Lake Mayor Bill Enouy.
Perhaps no other office market in the country's history has endured a more tumultuous period as that experienced by the Manhattan office market over the past six months.
That is, if people such as Andrew Sullivan would stop trivializing the traumatic workplace experiences that many lesbians and gay men have endured.
Heart attacks show an unfortunate affinity for people who have endured major depression (with symptoms of extreme sorrow, apathy, and hopelessness) or recurring periods of intense sadness, contend epidemiologist William W.