end (one's) life

(redirected from end their lives)

end (one's) life

1. To commit suicide. If you've had thoughts about ending your life, please seek help by calling a crisis hotline.
2. To spend one's final days (in a particular way or place). I've already told my kids that I don't want to end my life in a nursing home.
See also: end, life
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ˌend your ˈdays/ˈlife (in something)

spend the last part of your life in a particular state or place: He ended his days in poverty.
See also: days, end, life
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
(I thought impatiently), "the disturbing influence of women seems to be the only influence that I am fated to feel." As I still paced backward and forward in my room--it was useless to think now of fixing my attention on a book--I fancied I understood the motives which made men as young as I was retire to end their lives in a monastery.
Women in their sixties decided to end their lives most often.
The California Department of Public Health has just released a report that detailed the number of terminally ill patients over the past year who took advantage of the (http://www.familydocs.org/eol/end-of-life-option-act) California End-of-Life Options Act (EOLA), a law that allows certain patients to request a lethal dose of medication to end their lives. This report comes a year after EOLA went into effect on June 9, 2016.
Some organizations are advocating on behalf of patients who would like to end their lives. Organizations such as (https://www.compassionandchoices.org/communities/doctors-for-dignity/) Compassion & Choices and the (http://coalitionccc.org/) Coalition of Compassionate Care of California work to bridge the gap between patients and providers by offering presentations to doctors and directories of medical professionals willing to help patients who choose this route.
AS a result of a serious road traffic accident, in which I sustained brain injuries that left me unable to feed myself, speak, dress myself or bathe myself, I have total respect for those who would like to end their lives in dignity by visiting the clinic in Switzerland that offers euthanasia, without the consequences of prosecution.
What needs to be spelled out in any ethical or legal discussion around the law of assisted dying is that those wishing to get the SALC Report back on the table state categorically that 'we are dealing with free or voluntary choices by competent persons to end their lives. No-one is forced, coerced or unduly influenced to make that decision.
The court case comes after the Director of Public Prosecutions, Keir Starmer, issued new guidelines on assisted suicide that make it unlikely that those who help loved ones end their lives for compassionate reasons will be prosecuted.
A family statement released yesterday said: "Their decision in no way reflected on the wonderful and humbling care they have received from their consultant, doctors and nurses, for which the family, and they, were so appreciative." The Duffs are the latest Britons to end their lives at Dignitas.
Although there is no suggestion of them being helped by anyone else to end their lives, their deaths will reopen the debate on whether voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide for the terminally ill should be allowed in Britain.
A spokesman said: "The fact remains that, if euthanasia was ever legalised in Britain, vulnerable and seriously ill people would come under pressure to end their lives prematurely."
I think the difference between withholding treatment and actually intervening to help people end their lives is a fictitious difference.
In the June 12, 1995, issue of the conservative National Review, retired professor and psychoanalyst Ernest van den Haag called Kevorkian "a rare and courageous exception" to the doctors who know how to help patients end their lives but refuse "because of moral obligations or in fear of legal liabilities [and who] impose their own socially supported moral beliefs on patients who do not share them but cannot act unaided."