encourage (one) to (do something)

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encourage (one) to (do something)

To urge one to do something. My dad has always encouraged me to become an actress, but I just don't enjoy being the center of attention. That serious illness encouraged Colleen to start thinking about retirement.
See also: encourage

encourage someone to do something

to inspire or stimulate someone to do something; to give someone the courage to do something. We encouraged her to develop her musical talents. He encouraged himself to study hard so he could make it into medical school.
See also: encourage
References in classic literature ?
He should encourage us to have caprices, and forbid us to have missions.
However, I believe with every ounce of my soul that they would encourage us to carry on in purposeful ways that advance the beliefs and values by which they lived and died.
Listen to our advice (which we have plenty of), encourage us to teach the fundamentals of handball, ask us about the way to win--in the picture on this page, about 40 national championships are represented.
"Apparently the pitch is like a carpet now and it'll encourage us to play the ball a lot better."
<![CDATA[ Says Israel should encourage US to adopt trade embargo on Cuba as a model that will 'strangle and topple' the Iranian regime.]]>
The idea is that viewing them from our sofas will encourage us to visit.
MY employer is trying to encourage us to use the bus for work including going to meetings and visiting sites.
She adds that it "should encourage us to think creatively about ways in which we can reduce this exposure for pregnant women and young children;'
The list marks the launch of a pounds 1 million website project which is designed to encourage us to take an interest in our culture.
His infinite grace towards us should encourage us to say: "Thank you, God..
It doesn't really encourage us to see its source anew in the way that, for example, Vik Muniz's reassembled masterpieces do.
Of course, it's so intriguing, it will encourage us to find the other books about the Singers of Nevya: Sing the Light; Sing the Warmth; Receive the Gift.
After all, we don't refer to free speech as "political agitators' rights." Perhaps a more Kinseyan conception would encourage us to recognize "gay rights," if we must use the term, as rights we all enjoy, whether or not we care to exercise them.
Lastly, if the more conservative churches of the Anglican Communion continue to find this course offensive, then I would encourage us to feel sorry for them, but not to apologize to them.
(This is not easy, since the diet and fitness industries encourage us to be self-absorbed.) We must empty ourselves.