enchant

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enchant with (something)

1. To cast a spell on someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "enchant" and "with." The evil witch enchanted all of the forest animals with magic and put them to sleep.
2. To capture and hold one's attention by a particular means. A noun or pronoun can be used between "enchant" and "with." The baby is totally enchanted with that new mobile you hung above her crib—she just can't stop watching it. Susie is a great storyteller, so I'm sure she'll enchant you with her latest tale.
See also: enchant

enchant someone with something

 
1. . Lit. to bewitch someone or something with a magic spell. The children were enchanted with a spell that made them forget.
2. Fig. to fascinate someone with some object. She enchanted the children with the little drawings she made of them. We were enchanted with her drawings.
See also: enchant
References in classic literature ?
"Mine could speak too," said Don Quixote, "but that is not a sufficient reason for believing that what we see is the enchanted Moor."
The cuadrillero finding himself so disrespectfully treated by such a sorry-looking individual, lost his temper, and raising the lamp full of oil, smote Don Quixote such a blow with it on the head that he gave him a badly broken pate; then, all being in darkness, he went out, and Sancho Panza said, "That is certainly the enchanted Moor, Senor, and he keeps the treasure for others, and for us only the cuffs and lamp-whacks."
Sancho got up with pain enough in his bones, and went after the innkeeper in the dark, and meeting the officer, who was looking to see what had become of his enemy, he said to him, "Senor, whoever you are, do us the favour and kindness to give us a little rosemary, oil, salt, and wine, for it is wanted to cure one of the best knights-errant on earth, who lies on yonder bed wounded by the hands of the enchanted Moor that is in this inn."
For some time she was too enchanted to speak, and Prince Firouz Schah took advantage of her silence to explain to her all that had occurred, his despair at watching her disappear before his very eyes, the oath he had sworn to follow her over the world, and his rapture at finally discovering her in the palace at Cashmere.
The prince then inquired if she knew what had become of the enchanted horse since the Indian's death, but the princess could only reply that she had heard nothing about it.
The Sultan thought the question very natural, and told him the same story that the Princess of Bengal had done, adding that he had ordered the enchanted horse to be taken to his treasury as a curiosity, though he was quite ignorant how it could be used.
During her voyage hither on an enchanted horse, a portion of its enchantment has by some means been communicated to her person, and it can only be dissipated by certain perfumes of which I possess the secret.
The Sultan readily agreed to all that the prince proposed, and the following morning he desired that the enchanted horse should be taken from the treasury, and brought into the great square of the palace.
She slowly approached the enchanted horse, and with the help of her ladies, she mounted on its back.
Yet what most enchants Nordstrom's aristocrats, as we see in The Tomb of the Lonely Soldier, 2000, is women who are inert, their vulvas and anuses revealed for contemplation only, or perhaps the odd spanking experiment.