employ (someone) in (something)

(redirected from employed in)

employ (someone) in (something)

To employ someone to work in a certain area. I applied for the job as file clerk, but they employed me in data entry instead.
See also: employ

employ someone in something

to pay someone to work in a particular type of work. I employ Tom in machine maintenance. Laura is employed in accounting.
See also: employ
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the ultra wideband (UWB) technology [8] is employed in some approaches.
According to the correspondent of RTCI, a general strike was called in the production sites of phosphate by young unemployed who need to be employed in the units of the Gafsa Phosphate Company.
Anyone who suspects illegal workers are being employed in the Black Country should call Crimestoppers, in confidence, on 0800 555 111.
Employed in the insurance industry since 1981, Sanders has served in such positions as claim adjuster, supervisor, casualty manager, premium audit/loss control manager, home office audit manager, national field training manager, and regional claim manager.
We not only discern women in pursuit of legal solutions to their problems, but also see how they were perceived in that pursuit and the strategies they employed in their litigation.
For example, according to our estimates, a recent Mexican immigrant working in construction was 10.95 times more likely to be apprehended by the INS during the foregoing period than a non-Mexican worker employed in services.
The probability that a recently arrived immigrant i is employed in industry j depends on a vector of i's exogenous variables ([Z.sub.i]), namely,
The predicted probability that the ith recent immigrant from the 1990 sample would be employed in industry j [Mathematical Expression Omitted], given his individual characteristics [Mathematical Expression Omitted], and using this industry's "probability density function" for the 1980 sample, can be calculated by
where I is the total number of immigrant workers in the sample, [I.sub.j] represents the number of individuals who are employed in industry j in 1990, and [Mathematical Expression Omitted] defines the (model) predicted number of individuals in industry j if no structural differences between 1980 and 1990 existed.
For example, in 1990 about 35.42 percent of Mexican immigrants were employed in agriculture while our model predicts that share to be about 30.35 percent.
In 1990, however, the model overpredicts the percentage of recent-immigrant Mexicans employed in manufacturing (the estimated 1990 predicted employment share is 16.70 percent as compared to the actual 1990 share of 12.5 percent).
Expressing this in terms of marginal effects (Table IV in bold), we find that Mexicans were 5.8 percent more likely to be employed in construction and manufacturing than non-Hispanic natives of comparable characteristics during the period before the Act, and less likely to choose employment in agriculture.(13)
Therefore, we estimated a pooled earnings function that includes recent Mexican immigrants and non-Hispanic white males from the 1980 and 1990 PUMS (a sample similar to that employed in section V).(16) This is done in an attempt to "control" for non-Act movements in industry wages between 1980 and 1990.
That is, Mexican immigrants experienced a relatively large earnings decline in manufacturing in 1990, when compared to native non-Hispanic whites employed in the same industry during that year.
This article reveals how NN-based process control can be employed in the foundry industry.