emotion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

burst with (an emotion)

Of an emotion, to be so filled up with something as to be unable to contain it. I was bursting with anger after they fired me from my job. My kids burst with joy when we told them we were going to the theme park over the weekend.
See also: burst

choked with emotion

So overwhelmed with an emotion, either positive or negative, as to be unable to speak clearly or at all. I was positively choked with emotion by all the lovely speeches at my retirement party.
See also: choke, emotion

choked by emotion

So overwhelmed with an emotion, either positive or negative, as to be unable to speak clearly or at all. She was choked by emotion when she stepped up to speak at her mother's funeral.
See also: choke, emotion

mixed emotions

Positive and negative emotions that are experienced simultaneously and are often in conflict with one another. I've got mixed emotions about starting college this fall: on the one hand, I can't wait to start the next chapter in my education, but, on the other, I will be so sad leaving my friends and family behind.
See also: emotion, mixed

blanch with (an emotion)

To become visibly pale as a result of feeling a particular emotion. All of my friends ran into the creepy haunted house, but I blanched with fear when I saw it. Stella blanched with disgust at the plate of cooked ants that had been set before her.
See also: blanch

blush with (an emotion)

To have a red face while feeling a particular emotion (which is stated after "with"). I blushed with embarrassment when the teacher caught me not paying attention in class and yelled at me.
See also: blush

boil with (an emotion)

To express or feel an emotion, typically anger, very intensely. Things are often tense between my mom and my aunt, so when they had to spend days together on our family vacation, they were soon boiling with anger. When I saw that someone had backed into my new car, I immediately boiled with rage.
See also: boil

pique (one's) (emotion)

To arouse a particular emotion in one. While the special effects looked impressive, it was the movie's approach to its female characters that piqued my interest. Nothing piques my ire like people who don't use their turn signals when they're driving!
See also: pique

pregnant with (something)

Full of, or fraught with, or having a lot of something. Just before naming the guilty party, he gave a pause that seemed pregnant with meaning, and I wondered whether he was telling me the truth. Her speech was pregnant with emotion, and her eyes brimmed with tears as she spoke.
See also: pregnant

let one's emotions show

to be emotional, especially where it is not appropriate. I'm sorry for the outburst. I didn't mean to let my emotions show. Please stop crying. You mustn't let your emotions show.
See also: emotion, let, show
References in classic literature ?
Angell suggests that the display of emotion in such cases may be due to past experience, generating habits which would require only the stimulation of cerebral reflex arcs.
If it were necessary for me to take sides on this question, I should agree with this conclusion; but I think my thesis as to the analysis of emotion can be maintained without coming to.
According to our definitions, if James is right, an emotion may be regarded as involving a confused perception of the viscera concerned in its causation, while if Cannon and Sherrington are right, an emotion involves a confused perception of its external stimulus.
of each literary work as a product of Fine Art, appealing with peculiar power both to our minds and to our emotions, not least to the sense of Beauty and the whole higher nature.
Perhaps not," said Charlotte; "I can love enough to feel a great and deep interest in those who are dear to me, but I never yet have experienced such emotions, as you describe--I believe, in this particular, you have formed a just opinion of me, Mr.
His eye, which was contracted with inward anguish, gleamed on the persons of those whose breath was his fame; and the latter emotion for an instant predominated.
The light was not strong enough to render their features distinct, though it was quite evident that they were governed by very different emotions.
These being hastily gobbled up, the chicken spread its wings, and alighted close by Phoebe on the window-sill, where it looked gravely into her face and vented its emotions in a croak.
It is probable that the latent emotions of this parting hour had revived, in some degree, his bedimmed and enfeebled faculties.
Alas," cried Monte Cristo, striving to repress his emotion, "if Lord Wilmore was your unknown benefactor, I fear you will never see him again.
She liked women, but where emotion was concerned they were as flies on a lump of sugar.
It wasn't that they were cruel, or meant to hurt, or even stupid exactly; but she had always found that the ordinary person had so little emotion in his own life that the scent of it in the lives of others was like the scent of blood in the nostrils of a bloodhound.
The undertaker, instructed to spare no expense, provided long-tailed black horses, with black palls on their backs and black plumes upon their foreheads; coachmen decorated with scarves and jack-boots, black hammercloths, cloaks, and gloves, with many hired mourners, who, however, would have been instantly discharged had they presumed to betray emotion, or in any way overstep their function of walking beside the hearse with brass-tipped batons in their hands.
She even felt, in spite of herself, an emotion of gratitude to the few who ventured to defend him.
It was only one phase of the multitudinous emotions which had assailed her.