eleven

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Related to elevens: elevenses

(a) quarter of (a given hour in time)

A quarter of an hour (15 minutes) before the named hour in time (e.g., "quarter of six" would mean 5:45). Primarily heard in US. A: "What time does the movie start?" B: "Not until a quarter of eight, so we've got plenty of time!" I thought I'd be home already, but with this traffic, it'll be quarter of before I'm back.
See also: given, hour, of, quarter

11 Downing Street

The address of the residence of the Chancellor of the Exchequer of the United Kingdom, used by extension to refer to the Chancellor of the Exchequer or UK's treasury department. Primarily heard in UK. What's the word from 11 Downing Street? How will this change affect our taxes? 10 and 11 Downing Street have to find a way to work together on this issue, or else it will never be resolved.
See also: 11, Down, street

at the tender age of

At the young age of. This phrase is used to emphasize how young one was when one did something in particular. The age is stated after "of." I'm not surprised to hear that he was doing science experiments at the tender age of seven—he's a child genius!
See also: age, of, tender

film at 11

cliché Primarily heard in US.
1. A phrase used in broadcast journalism during clips of news stories that are to be featured in greater detail later (when a news program airs, traditionally at 11 PM) Coming up tonight—doctors who let their pets perform surgery. Film at 11.
2. Used by extension to indicate something not at all newsworthy. A: "Don't you think that's interesting?" B: "No, not really. 'Local boy discovers big pit in a field. Film at 11.'"
See also: 11, film

ground zero

1. The center or primary location of some disaster. Volunteers at ground zero have been describing scenes of chaos caused by the hurricane's destructive force.
2. The target or location of some violent act of destruction, especially a bombing. The prime minister toured the destruction at ground zero following the enemy bombardment.
3. The site of New York City's World Trade Center following its destruction during the attacks on September 11, 2001. In this usage, the phrase is usually capitalized. Visiting Ground Zero still leaves me filled with grief beyond words, even after all these years.
See also: ground, zero

more at 11

cliché Primarily heard in US.
1. Formerly used by television news broadcasters to advertise the fact that footage of a breaking news story would be shown during the 11 PM local news slot. Coming up tonight—doctors who let their pets perform surgery? More at 11.
2. Used by extension to indicate something not at all newsworthy. A: "Don't you think that's interesting?" B: "No, not really. 'Local boy discovers big pit in a field. More at 11.'"
See also: 11, more

Number 11

The address of the residence of the Chancellor of the Exchequer of the United Kingdom, used by extension to refer to the Chancellor of the Exchequer or UK's treasury department. Primarily heard in UK. What's the word from Number 11? How will this change affect our taxes? Number 10 and Number 11 Downing Street have to find a way to work together on this issue, or else it will never be resolved.
See also: 11, number

quarter past (a given hour in time)

A quarter of an hour (15 minutes) after the named hour in time. A: "What time does the movie start?" B: "Not until a quarter past eight, so we've got plenty of time!" I thought I'd be home already, but with this traffic, it'll be quarter past before I'm back.
See also: given, hour, past, quarter

up to eleven

To an intense, excessive, or extreme degree; at or beyond the maximum amount or normal threshold. (Coined in the 1984 comedy film This is Spinal Tap, referring to the guitar player's amplifier going to eleven, as opposed to the traditional limit of ten.) Some of the best nights we had when we were teenagers were spent just driving aimlessly, cranking the car stereo up to eleven. Whenever our parents' fighting got up to eleven, my sister and I made ourselves scarce.
See also: eleven, to, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ground zero

The site of any disaster; specifically, and often capitalized (Ground Zero), the site of New York’s World Trade Center, wrecked by airplanes on September 11, 2001. Originally the term designated the central point of a nuclear detonation or similar large blast, but since the attacks of 2001, often referred to simply as nine-eleven, it has been used both specifically and metaphorically. It was first used with reference to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and then was extended to other disasters, such as earthquakes. Referring to the economic downturn, a character in Ian Rankin’s novel The Complaints (2009) asked, “Does nobody realize this is Credit Crunch Ground Zero?”
See also: ground, zero
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
The eleven went down in a body before breakfast, for a plunge in the cold bath in a corner of the close.
"How many runs?" Away scamper three boys to the scoring table, and are back again in a minute amongst the rest of the eleven, who are collected together in a knot between wicket.
Aislabie, who came in for the last wicket; how the Lord's men were out by half-past twelve o'clock for ninety-eight runs; how the captain of the School eleven went in first to give his men pluck, and scored twenty-five in beautiful style; how Rugby was only four behind in the first innings; what a glorious dinner they had in the fourth-form school; and how the cover- point hitter sang the most topping comic songs, and old Mr.
And by his side, in white flannel shirt and trousers, straw hat, the captain's belt, and the untanned yellow cricket shoes which all the eleven wear, sits a strapping figure, near six feet high, with ruddy, tanned face and whiskers, curly brown hair, and a laughing, dancing eye.
It merges the individual in the eleven; he doesn't play that he may win, but that his side may."
"And then the captain of the eleven!" said the master; "what a post is his in our School-world!
"I am surprised to see Arthur in the eleven," said the master, as they stood together in front of the dense crowd, which was now closing in round the ground.
Only eleven runs to make now, and the crowd scarcely breathe.
But such a defeat is a victory: so think Tom and all the School eleven, as they accompany their conquerors to the omnibus, and send them off with three ringing cheers, after Mr.
As Tom and the rest of the eleven were turning back into the close, and everybody was beginning to cry out for another country-dance, encouraged by the success of the night before, the young master, who was just leaving the close, stopped him, and asked him to come up to tea at half-past eight, adding, "I won't keep you more than half an hour, and ask Arthur to come up too."
"Oh, he is comfortably at supper with the eleven, forgetful of his oldest friends," said the master.
There he found the eleven at high jinks after supper, Jack Raggles shouting comic songs and performing feats of strength, and was greeted by a chorus of mingled remonstrance at his desertion and joy at his reappearance.
...You are right, you are right; why wait till eleven o'clock to-morrow evening?
Our Soldiers and Lowest Classes of Workmen are Triangles with two equal sides, each about eleven inches long, and a base or third side so short (often not exceeding half an inch) that they form at their vertices a very sharp and formidable angle.
After a prolonged dispute the matter was decided by the peasants taking these eleven stacks, reckoning them as fifty loads each.