edge up


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

edge up

1. To move or creep up toward someone or something very slowly, cautiously, or furtively. Usually followed by "to." I edged up to the singer and nervously asked if she would sign my copy of her CD. The burglar began edging up to the skylight to see if there was any movement in the house below.
2. To cause someone or something to move toward someone or something else very slowly, cautiously, or furtively. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "edge" and "up." She edged her chair up to the side of her father's hospital bed so as not to disturb his sleep. The burglar began edging up to the skylight to see if there was any movement in the house below.
3. To rise physically up something or toward some point or level at a gradual or incremental pace. Usually said of water. The tide edged up the shoreline, washing away the drawings and castles children had made on the beach. I could feel water edging up to my waist as the boat continued to sink.
4. To rise gradually or incrementally, as in value or amount. The cost of living hasn't stopped edging up, but people's wages have remained stagnant for years, so many are finding it difficult just to get by. Supermarkets have warned that their prices are going to edge up if the new tax law is passed.
5. To cause something to rise gradually or incrementally in value or amount. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "edge" and "up." Having to pay for my brother's flight has edged the wedding costs up to $10,000.
6. To approach or get closer to something, such as a goal or target, gradually or incrementally. Usually followed by "to." We're continuing to edge up to our funding goal, but I'm concerned that we won't get enough by the time the fundraiser finishes. The petition is edging up to the 100,000 signatures it requires to be debated before Parliament.
See also: edge, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
See also: