eclipse

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Related to eclipsing: eclipsing binary

be in eclipse

To be dwindling in success or popularity. Sure, that author was big 10 years ago, but her career is in eclipse now, and I doubt her new book will be a big seller.
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in eclipse

Dwindling in success, popularity, or relevance. (Typically used in slightly more formal language.) Sure, that author was big 10 years ago, but her career is in eclipse now, and I doubt her new book will be a big seller.
See also: eclipse
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in eclipse

FORMAL
If something is in eclipse, it is much less successful and important than it used to be. The Socialist party, which has spent most of the past 21 years in government, is now in eclipse. Since then, his career has been mostly in eclipse. Note: An eclipse of the sun is an occasion when the moon is between the earth and the sun, so that for a short time you cannot see part or all of the sun. An eclipse of the moon is an occasion when the earth is between the sun and the moon, so that for a short time you cannot see part or all of the moon because it is covered by the shadow of the earth.
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Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

in eclipse

1 (of a celestial object) obscured by another or the shadow of another. 2 losing or having lost significance, power, or prominence.
2 1991 Atlantic Within a decade of his death…he was in eclipse: not written about, undiscussed, forgotten in architecture schools.
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Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
The models for Epsilon Aurigae proposed by different observers differ in detail, but all tend to agree on the sliding brick model: The eclipsing body is more than a secondary star; it must somehow include at least one oblong cloud of obscuring matter.
Backman of the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu, reporting on infrared observations at Mauna Kea and Kitt Peak (Ariz.) National Observatory and with the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), considers the eclipsing object to be a dark cloud with a binary star embedded in it.
The hot spot seems to be in the center of the eclipsing body, which then would be a hot source surrounded by a cool region or cloud.