eat (one's) words

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eat (one's) words

To retract, regret, or feel foolish about what one has previously said. You think I can't get an A in this class, but I'll make you eat your words when we get our report cards! After my negative prediction for the season, I certainly ate my words when the team started out undefeated.
See also: eat, word
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

eat (one's) words

Fig. to have to take back one's statements; to confess that one's predictions were wrong. You shouldn't say that to me. I'll make you eat your words. John was wrong about the election and had to eat his words.
See also: eat, word
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eat one's words

Be forced to retract something one has said, as in The incumbent won easily, so I had to eat my words. This expression was already proverbial in John Ray's English Proverbs (1670). [Second half of 1500s]
See also: eat, word
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eat your words

COMMON If someone has to eat their words, they have to admit that an opinion that they stated publicly has now been proved wrong. He was very doubtful about our chances of success but he'll be eating his words now. The company's chairman has had to eat his words about the company being recession-proof.
See also: eat, word
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

eat your words

retract what you have said, especially when forced to do so.
See also: eat, word
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

eat your ˈwords

be forced to admit that what you have said before was wrong: Nick told everyone that he’d be picked for the team, but when he wasn’t chosen he had to eat his words.
See also: eat, word
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

eat (one's) words

To retract something that one has said.
See also: eat, word
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eat one's words, to

To be forced to retract a statement, usually in a humiliating way. The term first appeared in a sixteenth-century tract by John Calvin on Psalm 62: “God eateth not his word when he hath once spoken.” In 1618 Sir Walter Raleigh wrote in his memoirs, “Nay wee’le make you confesse . . . and eat your own words,” and in 1670 the expression appeared in John Ray’s collection of English proverbs.
See also: eat, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Denmark 1 Rep of Ire 1 SHANE DUFFY made Denmark eat their words with the goal that took Mick McCarthy's men three points clear at the top.
LET us hope that those people who made derogotary remarks about Andy Murray breaking down in tears when he announced his intended retirement are now having to eat their words.
Some people say how can people eat their words? For me, I will eat my words if it is nutritious enough and if that is what I have to do to have peace in the family.
Vardy will hope he can make his critics eat their words in Tuesday's friendly with Italy.
Every fight people have counted him out, and every fight people have had to eat their words.
ITALY midfielder Alessandro Florenzi believes their critics have underestimated the strength of the current squad and he will be more than happy to see them "eat their words" again.
THERE is something about the transfer window that just leads to people having to eat their words. Merely a week before the transfer deadline German international Per Mertesacker (pictured) pledged: "I am a player of Werder Bremen and I love playing in the green and white."
We're also taking on Wigan as they are beginning to take on the look of a side not sure they can avoid relegation, while Steve Kean's Blackburn adventure is coming along nicely and the sceptics who scoffed when he got the job may have to eat their words.
In January officials at Fidelity Information Services denied reports that the company would eliminate jobs at its west Little Rock campus only to eat their words a month later when they told some employees their jobs were being eliminated or moved to the corporate headquarters in Jacksonville, Fla.
The number of times he stopped City playing - he's certainly making his critics eat their words. Mind you one mistake and I'm sure people will get straight onto his back again.
Keane has made the critics eat their words with performances reminiscent of the days when he was being hailed as one of the world's best midfielders.
Those reporters, commentators and FAW members that have made and supported this appointment will have to eat their words.
But a defiant 1-0 victory over Deportivo La Coruna in the usually intimidating Estadio Riazor has made more than a few of those critics eat their words.
But a defiant 1-0 victory over Deportivo La Coruna in the Estadio Riazor has made more than a few of those critics eat their words.
Occasionally, even the most experienced Washington observers must eat their words. Last year, I detailed in this column (October 2003, p.