eat (someone or something)

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eat (someone or something)

1. To pay the cost of something. If we sent the wrong file to the printer, then we'll just have to eat the cost of the fliers and start over again.
2. To cause one to worry. What's eating you? Did something bad happen?
3. vulgar slang To perform cunnilingus.
See also: eat

eat it

1. rude slang An interjection by a speaker who is annoyed or frustrated with someone else. Eat it, Ben! You cheated on me, remember?
2. slang To fall down, usually in an especially clumsy manner. Whoa, she really ate it on the ice out there—is she OK?
See also: eat

eat me

vulgar slang An expression of anger and dismissal directed at someone who is irritating or who one has contempt for. Potentially offensive, as it can also be used to refer to oral sex. Oh, eat me, will you? I refuse to do anything you say!
See also: eat

eat

1. tv. [for something] to bother or worry someone. Nothing’s eating me. I’m just the nervous type.
2. tv. to absorb the cost or expense of something. We’ll eat the costs on this one. It’s the least we can do.
3. tv. to perform oral sex on someone. (Usually objectionable.) She said she wanted to eat me!
References in classic literature ?
"Couldn't I eat something besides people?" she asked.
"It will do you good to eat something. Your fever has burned out, and you are merely weak.
"Yes, an't please your honour, I have; I may challenge the country for that--but let me beg your ladyship to eat something."
On reaching the village he dismounted and went to the nearest house, intending to rest if but for a moment, eat something, and try to sort out the stinging and tormenting thoughts that confused his mind.
I replied that nothing would please me better than to tell them, but that I was starving, and would fain eat something first.
He did not understand why the old princess took his hand, and looking compassionately at him, begged him not to worry himself, and Dolly persuaded him to eat something and led him out of the room, and even the doctor looked seriously and with commiseration at him and offered him a drop of something.
Stelling came with a little basket, which she hung on Maggie's arm, saying: "Do remember to eat something on the way, dear." Maggie's heart went out toward this woman whom she had never liked, and she kissed her silently.
"Will you go down and try to eat something, sir?" he suggested.
I was just going to invite you to come here, to supper, my dear Ribby, to eat something MOST DELICIOUS."
"Would it be possible, carver," said Sancho, "now that Doctor Pedro Recio is not here, to let me eat something solid and substantial, if it were even a piece of bread and an onion?"
He chose a cheap eating-house and went in; there was a smell of hot things, and it made him feel slightly sick: he meant to eat something nourishing enough to keep up for the rest of the day, but his stomach revolted at the sight of food.
"We had better eat something and keep up our strength," I suggested.
On the whole she is behaving in a most exemplary way today (not once have we caught her trying to go out into the washing-house), and we compliment her at dinner-time, partly because she deserves it, and partly to make her think herself so good that she will eat something, just to maintain her new character.
After walking a long time they came to a little brook that trickled across the path, and here Ojo sat down to rest and eat something from his basket.
"Come, eat something," she said; but I put both away from me, feeling as if a drop or a crumb would have choked me in my present condition.