eat someone out of house and home

eat (one) out of house and home

To eat large quantities of one's food. This phrase is usually used hyperbolically. Kim may be tiny, but she has a big appetite, so don't be surprised if she eats you out of house and home.
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out

eat someone out of house and home

Eat so much as to deplete someone's resources, as in The kids are eating her out of house and home. This hyperbole was well known by the time Shakespeare used it (2 Henry IV, 2:1): "He hath eaten me out of house and home."
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out, someone

eat someone out of house and home

mainly BRITISH
If someone eats you out of house and home, they eat so much food that it costs you a lot of money to feed them. My children are eating me out of house and home! They eat everybody out of house and home but nobody minds because they provide such first-rate entertainment. Note: This expression was used in Shakespeare's play `Henry IV Part II', act 2 scene 1 (1597). When asked why she wants her lodger Sir John Falstaff arrested, the landlady Mistress Quickly replies: `He hath eaten me out of house and home; he hath put all my substance into that fat belly of his.'
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out, someone

eat someone out of house and home

eat a lot of someone else's food. informal
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out, someone