eat out of house and home


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

eat (one) out of house and home

To eat large quantities of one's food. This phrase is usually used hyperbolically. Kim may be tiny, but she has a big appetite, so don't be surprised if she eats you out of house and home.
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

eat someone out of house and home

Fig. to eat everything that someone has in the house. That huge dog is eating us out of house and home. The entire football team came over and ate poor Sally out of house and home.
See also: and, eat, home, house, of, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eat someone out of house and home, to

To consume a great deal. This expression is at least two thousand years old. It appeared in the Alexandrian philosopher Philo’s De Agricultura (ca. a.d. 40) as well as in numerous English writings, before Shakespeare used it for Mistress Quickly’s description of the gluttonous Falstaff: “He hath eaten me out of house and home” (Henry IV, Part 2, 2.1).
See also: and, eat, house, of, out, someone, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also: