eat one's hat

eat (one's) hat

A humorous action that one will allegedly take if something very unlikely happens. Kevin is always late, so if he actually shows up on time, I'll eat my hat.
See also: eat, hat

I'll eat my hat

An expression describing the hypothetical act of penance that one promises to take if they are wrong about something. I'll eat my hat if the repairs end up costing less than $1,000. If you can prove me wrong, I'll eat my hat.
See also: eat, hat
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

I'll eat my hat.

Fig. I will be very surprised. (Used to express strong disbelief in something.) If Joe really joins the Army, I'll eat my hat. If this car gives you any trouble, I'll eat my hat.
See also: eat, hat
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eat one's hat

Declare one's certainty that something will not happen or is untrue. This hyperbolic expression almost always follows an if-clause, as in If he's on time, I'll eat my hat, that is, "I'll consume my headgear if I'm wrong." Charles Dickens used it in Pickwick Papers (1837): "If I knew as little of life as that, I'd eat my hat and swallow the buckle whole." [First half of 1800s]
See also: eat, hat
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

I'll eat my hat

used to indicate that you think a particular thing is extremely unlikely to happen.
See also: eat, hat
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

eat one’s hat

tv. to do something extraordinary. (Always with if.) I’ll eat my hat if our advertisement actually brings us a president.
See also: eat, hat
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

eat one's hat, to

To declare one’s readiness to consume one’s headgear if a statement should prove false, an event should not occur, and so on. The likelihood of actually doing so is presumably very remote, which is the very analogy being drawn (to a statement’s being false, an event not occurring, and so on). The expression appeared in Dickens’s Pickwick Papers (1836), in the words of one clerical gentleman, “Well if I knew as little of life as that, I’d eat my hat and swallow the buckle whole.”
See also: eat, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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