eat dirt

eat dirt

1. To be subject to insults and harsh treatment. Sometimes used as a hostile imperative. Because of all the bragging I'd done beforehand, my friends made me eat dirt for finishing last in the race. Eat dirt, Jimmy!
2. To retract, regret, or feel foolish about what one has previously said. You think I can't get an A in this class, but I'll make you eat dirt when we get our report cards! After my negative prediction for the season, I certainly ate dirt when the team started out undefeated.
See also: dirt, eat
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

eat dirt

suffer insults or humiliation. informal
In the USA eat dirt also has the sense of ‘make a humiliating retraction’ or ‘eat your words’.
See also: dirt, eat
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

eat crow/humble pie/dirt, to

To acknowledge an embarrassing error and humiliatingly abase oneself. All these expressions date from the early nineteenth century, eating crow from America and eating humble pie and dirt from Britain. The origin of the first is not known, although it is generally acknowledged that the meat of a crow tastes terrible. A story cited by Charles Funk and published in the Atlanta Constitution in 1888 claims that toward the end of the War of 1812, during a temporary truce, an American went hunting and by accident crossed behind the British lines, where he shot a crow. He was caught by an unarmed British officer who, by complimenting him on his fine shooting, persuaded him to hand over his gun. The officer then pointed the gun and said that as punishment for trespassing the American must take a bite out of the crow. The American obeyed, but when the officer returned his gun, he took his revenge and made the Briton eat the rest of the bird. The source of humble pie is less far-fetched; it is a corruption of (or pun on) umble-pie, “umbles” being dialect for the heart, liver, and entrails of the deer, which were fed to the hunt’s beaters and other servants while the lord and his guests ate the choice venison. This explanation appeared in 1830 in Vocabulary of East Anglia by Robert Forby. The analogy to eating dirt is self-evident. It appeared in Frederick W. Farrar’s Julian Home (1859): “He made up for the dirt they had been eating by the splendour of his entertainment.”
See also: crow, eat, humble, pie
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
Not more than any other youngster did he like to eat dirt or to be misjudged, but he saw himself in a cleft stick.
Eating crow is of a family of idioms having to do with eating and being proven incorrect, such as to "eat dirt" and to "eat your hat" (or shoe), all probably originating from "to eat one's words," which first appears in print in 1571 in one of John Calvin's tracts, on Psalm 62: "God eateth not his words when he hath once spoken." (Wikipedia, April 8, 2019)
Brett Finlay is a professor of microbiology and the author of Let Them Eat Dirt; Jessica Finlay is an expert in gerontology.
"I've developed a real passion for cooking vegetarian food; it's what gets me excited in the kitchen, and that's what I want to share with people when they eat DIRT."
And even if the plants aren't toxic, do you really want your baby to eat dirt or drink water from plant trays?
WHAT Tuesday's defeat in Dunedin taught us about this British and Irish Lions tour is that a clear gulf is emerging between the Test team and those destined to eat dirt for the remainder of the trip.
Along the way Gregor meets and develops a fascination for the camp golden girl, Ashley, a Hollywood starlet and leader of the Eat Dirt campaign.
Health guru Dr Josh Axe describes the five different types of problem gut in his bestselling book Eat Dirt. Find out here which type you have, and follow naturopathic nutritionist Julie Haigh's tips on how to boost your health for each one
The politician also suggested that he would rather "eat dirt than talk about" appealing for financial help from Jordan's oil-rich neighbors.
The scientists have written the new book Let Them Eat Dirt, to explain their conviction that microbiota (the microbes that live in and on humans) are great for our health.
They have written Let Them Eat Dirt, to explain their conviction that microbiota - microbes that live in and on humans - are great for our health.
* To help with digestion, koalas eat dirt once in a while.
Unfortunately, what you've done to this point limits what you can do now, unless you're willing to eat dirt and let yourself back into the group.
Most eat both plants and animals, and some also eat dirt.