eat


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eat (someone or something)

1. To pay the cost of something. If we sent the wrong file to the printer, then we'll just have to eat the cost of the fliers and start over again.
2. To cause one to worry. What's eating you? Did something bad happen?
3. vulgar slang To perform cunnilingus.
See also: eat

eat

1. tv. [for something] to bother or worry someone. Nothing’s eating me. I’m just the nervous type.
2. tv. to absorb the cost or expense of something. We’ll eat the costs on this one. It’s the least we can do.
3. tv. to perform oral sex on someone. (Usually objectionable.) She said she wanted to eat me!
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
n Using all your senses in choosing to eat food that is satisfying to you and nourishing to your body.
"So a chocolate mousse for example - we would not want our participants to not eat it at all, but we would advise them to eat it with mindfulness and with purpose and to enjoy those first few bites."
Third, eat only at the table.This ties eating only at the dining table and so prepares you for mindful eating.
The results of this study suggest that the most important determinants of children's body composition are the degree to which they and their mothers engage in emotional/uncontrolled eating and how often they eat by the television.
Research has shown that foods that individuals are pressured to eat become less desirable, and so, if pressured, children are even less likely to want to eat their broccoli or mac and cheese.
3Numerous studies Numerous studies have found that people who eat fast are three times more likely to be obese than people who eat slowly.The more you eat, the less flavour you enjoy.
In a commentary, also carried by the BMJ, Australian nutritionists Elizabeth Denney-Wilson and Karen Campbell suggested that the drive to eat quickly is a genetic survival mechanism -- humans are hardwired to over-consume energy when it is available.
I only allowed myself to eat a few specific foods, like cottage cheese and oatmeal, which I felt were "safe" since they wouldn't cause weight gain.
They're backed by good science, they're specific (not just "eat less bad fat"), they go beyond the obvious ("switch from whole milk to fat-free"), and they're doable.
Most, but not all of the lactose (natural milk sugar) in yogurt is digested by beneficial bacteria, so the majority of lactose-intolerant people can eat yogurt unless they are very sensitive.
In the midst of all the chaos sits Michael Pollan, calmly nibbling a piece of homemade boar prosciutto and ruminating, "Let them eat cake made with unbleached organic flour and fresh butter from the local creamery." Pollan is the author of The Omnivore's Dilemma, an irritatingly excellent book.
"My Child Won't Eat!: How To Prevent & Solve The Problem" by pediatrician Carols Gonzalez is a thoroughly 'parent friendly' introduction to the common problem of getting children to eat what they are served.
It is common for athletes to fill up on fluids and then not be hungry when it is time to eat.
Knowledgeably compiled and expertly co-authored by Joan Paterson and Brook Soltvedt, Eat Smart In Peru: How To Decipher The Menu, Know The Market Foods, And Embark On A Tasting Adventure is a superb introduction and guide for tourists and business travelers when dining, cooking, and eating in Peru.
For instance, bats that eat insects need to puncture the insect's hard outer skeleton.