easy mark


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easy mark

One who is or will be easy to swindle, con, persuade, or exploit. Refers to the slang meaning of "mark," the intended victim of a swindler or con artist. We should see if Larry will give us the 20 dollars; he's usually an easy mark.
See also: easy, mark

easy mark

n. a likely victim. Mary is an easy mark because she is so unsuspecting.
See also: easy, mark
References in periodicals archive ?
The notion is we'll send a signal to future grifters that we're not an easy mark," McKinney said.
Criminals look for such easy marks as people who are slouched over, preoccupied, or fumbling with packages.
That's what has made it such an easy mark for critics.
While they took it easy Mark Hughes' side went for the jugular, the manager declaring after a seventh victory in nine games had lifted Rovers into 10th: "This was maybe our best performance of the season.
Not only will you save money and avoid grief, but also you won't look like an easy mark to other slow-pay buyers in the market place.
The plumber probably thought he had found an easy mark.
Want to avoid looking like a stereotypical tourist and an easy mark for pickpockets?
Make sure that your company is not known as an easy mark for insurance fraud.
But Churchill himself was also culpable in this regard: he showed no real concern for the unfortunate millions who were handed across to one of the most brutal dictators of the last century, and understandably Stalin himself regarded him as naive and as an easy mark.
An unerring sense of the false or the superficial make them no easy mark for a leader whose sense of loyalty didn't match theirs.
Those that thought the imports would be an easy mark hadn't noticed that international parent breweries (Heineken, Guinness, Beck's, etc.
But, the Russian people are new to capitalism and proved to be an easy mark.
A blurb from Columbia University's Patricia Williams, hailing MacKinnon as "one of the most visible and effective advocates behind this nation's attention to crimes against women," laments that "because her brilliant writing is largely unread, she has become an ideological easy mark.
Is there a reaction to such arguably legitimate complaints/gripes which does not give the professor the reputation as an easy mark, but does allow him/her to sensibly incorporate into his grading information the fact that the student had a complaint worth considering?