easy come, easy go

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easy come, easy go

When something is easily obtained, it is typically lost just as easily. Of course you found a $10 on the street and immediately spent it—easy come, easy go!
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easy come, easy go

Cliché said to explain the loss of something that required only a small amount of effort to acquire in the first place. Ann found twenty dollars in the morning and spent it foolishly at noon. "Easy come, easy go," she said. John spends his money as fast as he can earn it. With John it's easy come, easy go.
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easy come, easy go

Readily won and readily lost, as in Easy come, easy go-that's how it is for Mark when he plays the stock market. This phrase states a truth known since ancient times and expressed in numerous proverbs with slightly different wording ( lightly come, lightly go; quickly come, quickly go). The adverb easy was substituted in the early 1800s.
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easy come, easy go

INFORMAL
You say easy come, easy go to mean that if money or objects are easy to get, you do not care very much about spending it or losing them. Note: In the first idiom below, ABC is pronounced `a b c', as if you are spelling it out. My attitude to money is easy come, easy go. That's to say, I earn a lot, but I also give quite a lot away in different ways.
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easy come, easy go

used to indicate that something acquired without effort or difficulty may be lost or spent casually and without regret.
Although recorded in this exact form only from the mid 19th century, easy come, easy go had parallels in medieval French and in the English sayings light come, light go (mid 16th century) and quickly come, quickly go (mid 19th century).
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ˌeasy ˈcome, ˌeasy ˈgo

(saying) something that has been obtained very easily and quickly may be lost or wasted in the same way: Her parents have given her all the money she wants, but she’s always in debt. With her, it’s a case of easy come, easy go.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Everyday Easy comes from a model who became a patisserie chef, and takes familiar dishes and turns them into special creations simply by adding a few common ingredients, from bacon to rosemary or balsamic vinegar.
A kidnapping is suspected, since the missing young woman, Rosemary Goldsmith (who Easy comes to think of as the titular Rose Gold), missing from her dorm at UC Santa Barbara for two weeks, is the daughter of a very wealthy weapons manufacturer and philanthropist.
Nothing easy comes quickly; nothing worthwhile comes without effort or waiting for just a bit.
While Kinda Easy comes alive when stepping onto the Wimbledon sand - remember him landing his first two rounds of the Derby this summer?
According to the company, BusinessMap24 Easy comes with an easy-to-use set-up wizard and address importer, and features proximity search; an interactive map-based location searcher; detailed location maps and route planning to business locations.
Nothing easy comes out of Cornwall and Redruth are in fourth place on merit," he said earlier this week.
The Roll Easy comes with two different rollers that reportedly are easy to use and change.
Easy comes to rely on old instincts for self-preservation as the story finds him returning to once-familiar territory.
The most casual users will quit until something easy comes along,'' said Heath Terry, an analyst with Credit Suisse First Boston in San Francisco.
Often, after the mystery has been solved and the bad guy punished, even Easy comes off looking like not a very admirable person.
The best example for me of the argument that the use of technology is easy comes from a frequently aired television commercial for America Online.