ease off

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ease off

1. To become less harsh or severe. I think you need to ease off on your punishment. I mean, it's not like he got into serious trouble. When did the weatherman say this thunderstorm is supposed to ease off?
2. To lessen slowly over time. I think you should try to sell your house now because skyrocketing prices in the area will probably ease off soon.
See also: ease, off
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ease off (on someone or something)

 and ease up (on someone or something)
to reduce the urgency with which one deals with someone or something; to put less pressure on someone or something. Ease off on John. He has been yelled at enough today. Yes, please ease off. I can't stand any more. Tell them to ease up on the horses. They are getting tired.
See also: ease, off

ease off

(on someone or something ) and ease up (on someone or something ) to reduce the urgency with which one deals with someone or something; to put less pressure on someone or something. Ease off on John. He has been yelled at enough today. Yes, please ease off. I can't stand any more. Tell them to ease up on the horses. They are getting tired.
See also: ease, off

ease off

[for something] to diminish. The rain began to ease off. The storm seems to have eased off a little.
See also: ease, off
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ease off

1. Also, ease up. Lessen in severity, relax; abate. For example, I wish you'd ease off on Harold; he's doing the best he can, or The wind's eased up so I think the storm is just about over. [Late 1800s] Also see let up.
2. Fall away, gradually decrease, as in The market's easing off, so we may get some stocks more cheaply. [Late 1800s]
See also: ease, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ease off

v.
1. To diminish gradually in intensity or severity: My headache eased off after I took an aspirin.
2. To move away from someone or something slowly and carefully: The snake eased off from the mongoose. Better ease off—they have a gun.
3. To treat someone less severely: The principal eased off on the student and only gave a warning. The coach has made us practice very hard and hasn't eased off for days.
See also: ease, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The same figure as was recorded in March, it is slightly lower than May's 12-year high (+25%) and a return to the climate of strong price pressures that seemed to be easing off.
But there was a warning that the mini boom of recent years could be easing off.
But I still want to finish this season on a good note, so there will be no easing off as far as I'm concerned."
While the slowdown may simply represent an easing off of what was a breathless pace over the past three to four years, a prolonged or deepened slump in these areas could spell trouble for certain industry sectors in the years ahead."
But as well as easing off on those big-distance training runs, anyone doing even a relay needs to make sure they get a good night's sleep ahead of the main event on May 2.
Bath coach John Connolly admitted his players threw the game away by easing off after the break at the Stoop yesterday, saying: "We gave Harlequins momentum.
SCUNTHORPE almost paid the price for easing off after a superb early show.
"Normally we experience a slight easing off in the summer months but this year there has been no let up,."
Paul Hanagan may have had the apprentices' championship sewn up months ago, but he is showing no sign of easing off, and braved the cold and wet conditions to land a 135-1 double, starting off by taking the two-year-old claimer on 7-1 chance Janes Gem for Chris Thornton, writes David Carr.
MORTON took advantage of being involved in the only First Division fixture of the day, easing off the bottom of the table with a 3-1 victory over HAMILTON.