early bird catches the worm, the

the early bird catches the worm

Someone who is very active and alert in the early hours of the morning is apt to find success. We need to get to the store early if we want to have the best selection. The early bird catches the worm, you know.
See also: bird, catch, early, worm

The early bird catches the worm.

Prov. If you wake up and get to work early, you will succeed. (Sometimes used to remark that someone is awake and working surprisingly early, as in the first example.) Fred: What are you doing in the office at 7:30 A.M.? Jane: The early bird catches the worm. I didn't expect to see you studying at the library at this hour of the morning. The early bird catches the worm, huh?
See also: bird, catch, early, worm

early bird catches the worm

Also, early bird gets the worm. One who arrives first has the best chance for success, as in She's always the first one in line and does well at these auctions-the early bird catches the worm! This proverbial saying, first recorded in English in 1605, is so familiar that it is often shortened to early bird, a term also used in the sense of "early riser", as in You can call me at seven-I'm an early bird, as well as "early diner" ( This restaurant has early-bird specials at lower prices).
See also: bird, catch, early, worm

the early bird catches the worm

1. You say the early bird catches the worm to mean that if you want to succeed in doing something, you should start as soon as possible. If you're going to make it to the Senate, you need to start right now. The early bird catches the worm.
2. You say the early bird catches the worm, to mean that people who get up early achieve more in their lives. Most of the serious buying at these markets happens between six and eight o'clock in the morning — the early bird catches the worm.
See also: bird, catch, early, worm

the ˌearly bird catches the ˈworm

(saying) you have to get up early or do something before others in order to be successful ▶ an ˈearly bird noun (humorous) a person who gets up, arrives, etc. very early
See also: bird, catch, early, worm

early bird catches the worm, the

Those who get there first have the best chance of success. This stricture appeared in William Camden’s book of proverbs (1605) and has remained part of the work ethic ever since. “Early bird” has been attached to restaurant offerings for diners who eat earlier than the prime hours. Such early bird specials feature lower prices. Similarly, early registration for conferences or hotels, purchases of tickets for air travel, concerts, and other events feature lower prices.
See also: bird, catch, early