eagle

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legal eagle

An especially clever, aggressive, or skillful attorney. I might be considered something of a legal eagle now, but I had to work for years to get enough experience to build my reputation.
See also: eagle, legal

eagle eye

1. Excellent eyesight, especially for something in particular. I have an eagle eye for spotting wildlife.
2. An ability to discern small details; a keen skill of observation. We need to get Sally's eagle eye on this manuscript because she'll be sure to spot any errors.
3. An attentive gaze. You need to keep an eagle eye on the kids because they will get into everything the minute you turn your back.
See also: eagle, eye

watch (someone or something) with an eagle eye

To observe very closely, without ever looking away. Like all birds of prey, eagles are known for their excellent vision. You've already been caught once, so you better believe the principal is going to be watching you with an eagle eye from now on. I've been watching that spot with an eagle eye, but still no sign of the leopard.
See also: eagle, eye, watch

eagle eye

acute eyesight; an intently watchful eye. (From the sharp eyesight of the eagle.) The students wrote their essays under the eagle eye of the headmaster. The umpire kept his eagle eye on the tennis match.
See also: eagle, eye

eagle eye

Unusually keen sight; also, keen intellectual vision. For example, Antiques dealers have an eagle eye for valuable objects, or A good manager has an eagle eye for employee errors. [Late 1500s]
See also: eagle, eye

an eagle eye

If someone has an eagle eye, they watch things carefully and are good at noticing things. No antiques shop, market or furniture shop escapes her eagle eye. Phil's played first-class cricket for five years in England under the eagle eye of our umpires. You must watch builders with an eagle eye because some will cheat the minute you turn your back. Note: You can also say that someone keeps an eagle eye on someone or something. Managers of Europe's top clubs are keeping an eagle eye on the World Championships, hoping to snap up new talent. Note: You can also describe someone as eagle-eyed. As the band were passing through security, an eagle-eyed official spotted an 18-inch knife in their luggage. Note: Eagles have very good eyesight, and are able to see small animals or objects from a great height.
See also: eagle, eye

an/somebody’s ˌeagle ˈeye

(informal) if somebody has an eagle eye, they watch things carefully and are good at noticing things: Nothing the staff did escaped the eagle eye of the manager (= he saw everything they did). ▶ ˌeagle-ˈeyed adj.: An eagle-eyed student spotted the mistake.
See also: eagle, eye

day the eagle shits

n. payday. (Military. Usually objectionable.) Tomorrow is the day the eagle shits, and do I ever need it.
See also: eagle, shit

eagle

n. a dollar bill. (From the picture of the eagle on the back.) This thing ain’t worth four eagles!

eagle freak

n. someone with strong concerns about the environment and conservation, especially the preservation of the eagle. (A play on eco freak.) The eagle freaks oppose building the dam.
See also: eagle, freak

eagle-eye

1. n. a busybody; a person who watches or monitors other people’s actions: a floorwalker, a detective, a hall-monitor. Some old eagle-eye across the street saw me standing in the cold and called my wife who came down and let me in.
2. n. an eye or eyes with very keen vision. Keep your eagle-eye trained on the entrance.

legal-beagle

and legal-eagle (ˈliglæˈbiglæ and ˈliglæˈiglæ)
n. a lawyer. I’ve got a legal-beagle who can get me out of this scrape.

legal-eagle

verb

when the eagle flies

and day the eagle flies
in. payday. (The eagle is the one found on U.S. currency.) I’ll pay you back when the eagle flies. I’ll find you the day the eagle flies.
See also: eagle, flies

day the eagle flies

verb
See also: eagle, flies
References in periodicals archive ?
You can also enter a contest by writing a story or drawing a picture about why you think eagles are important to the United States.
Over the past year, one of the female eagles had to be rescued from the sea by two passing boaters and taken to a recovery center in Ojai.
Today, an eagle sighting takes the breath away; not tat long ago it looked as if the actions of humans would take the eagles away.
We are not sure if the bald eagle can actually make it out there,'' Channel Islands National Park biologist Tim Coonan said.
Dahl, a first-time eagle counter, was the first to spot the young bald eagle.
Our majestic eagle was slipping toward extinction,'' the president said.
Wintering eagles are gregarious animals that share roosts and aren't shy of humans.
To this end, even as the final approvals of the merger are being sought, our merger agreement calls for Eagle Wireless to provide bridge financial assistance to ClearWorks.
With Eagles' portable PARCON 500 unit and this new in-situ model, Eagle can effectively and economically service a large segment of the hazardous waste market worldwide, while exceeding EPA standards and outperforming current technologies.
This news release, other than historical information, consists of forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, including fluctuations in results, impact of competitive products and pricing and other risks detailed from time to time in American Eagles SEC reports, including the Proxy Statement relating to this transaction.
info, the website created by UNITE HERE (the hotel employees union) as a resource for concerned investors in Eagle Hospitality (NYSE: EHP) called upon Eagle's Board of Directors to identify the members of its recently formed special committee.
info, an online resource for concerned investors in hotel REIT Eagle Hospitality Properties (NYSE: EHP) created by UNITE HERE (the union of hotel, gaming and textile workers) issued the second of its Investor Alerts.
info - an online resource for investors in hotel REIT Eagle Hospitality Properties (NYSE: EHP) who are concerned about the company's performance and are looking for ways to improve it.