dyed-in-the-wool


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dyed-in-the-wool

Permanent and or firmly established, such as in one's opinions or beliefs. Good luck getting him to listen to your political views—he's a dyed-in-the-wool liberal.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dyed-in-the-wool

[of someone] permanent or extreme. My uncle was a dyed-in-the-wool farmer. He wouldn't change for anything. Sally is a dyed-in-the-wool socialist.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dyed-in-the-wool

COMMON You use dyed-in-the-wool to describe a supporter of a particular set of beliefs or a member of a particular group, meaning that their beliefs or feelings are very strong and will never change. I'm a dyed-in-the-wool Labour man so he'll not get my vote. Mr Purves has made Hong Kong his home for the past 38 years but he remains a dyed-in-the-wool Scotsman. Michael is a dyed-in-the-wool traditionalist. Note: In medieval times, wool was often dyed before it was spun and woven. This meant that colour was more evenly distributed in the wool, and lasted longer.
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

dyed in the wool

(of a person) completely and permanently fixed in a particular belief or opinion; inveterate.
If yarn is dyed in the raw state, it produces a more even and permanent colour.
See also: dye, wool
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

dyed in the wool

Thoroughgoing, complete. The term, which dates from at least the sixteenth century, alludes to cloth made from wool that was dyed while raw (before it was spun) instead of being dyed piece by piece. The color therefore was “true” throughout, and this concept was transferred to other kinds of genuineness. “In half an hour he can come out an original democrat, dyed in the wool,” said Daniel Webster in a speech (Feb. 10, 1830). It has been a cliché since the early 1900s.
See also: dye, wool
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Even stranger, his work struck profound echoes with earlier French art, with Delacroix and Gerome, showing Dubuffet to be a dyed-in-the-wool Orientalist whose cartoony, leering images of Arabs, made in 1947-49 during three trips to Algeria, now look premonitory both of Twombly's mature sgraffito and Picasso's late-style cavaliers.
OK, usually I try to be a little lighthearted on this page, since I am a dyed-in-the-wool, warp-and-woof optimist.
The Street insider added: "Kevin, a dyed-in-the-wool male chauvinist, will have to do his best to keep her."