dull the edge of (something)

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dull the edge of (something)

To lessen some aspect of something, often so that it is less severe or effective. Likened to dulling the edge of a blade. Unfortunately, there is little we can do to dull the edge of such an emotional issue.
See also: dull, edge, of

dull the edge of

make less sensitive, interesting, or effective.
The image here is of making a knife's edge blunt.
See also: dull, edge, of
References in periodicals archive ?
DO REMEMBER the advice offered by Polonius to his son, setting off to university in Shakespeare's Hamlet: "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; for loan oft loses both itself and friend, and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
Neither a borrower nor a lender be; for loan doth oft lose both itself and friend, and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
Adding the thesis-like explanation dulls the edge of the poem.
It also diminishes the allure of the World Series and dulls the edge of competition between the two leagues.
Twenty-seven years later Russell would paint a major oil, When Law Dulls the Edge of Chance (1915) (Fig.
Russell's other major paintings featuring Mounted Policemen--Whiskey Smugglers Caught with the Goods, The Queen's War Hounds, and When Law Dulls the Edge of Chance--presented them in a similarly heroic light.
George Lane bought the other two, The Queen's War Hounds and When Law Dulls the Edge of Chance.
Then today's children could learn from the first act of Hamlet: ``Neither a borrower, nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
It's too bad, though, that Mazursky dulls the edge of comedy with his usual soft soap.