dull


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Related to dull: dull pain

all work and no play (makes Jack a dull boy)

Working too much can be bad for one's health or can make one boring. Come out to the pub with us tonight! All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. All work and no play isn't ideal, but I absolutely must finish this report tonight.
See also: all, and, dull, jack, no, play, work

be as dull as dishwater

To be very boring or unexciting. This phrase is often used to describe a person. My date with Dave was not great—he is as dull as dishwater. I fell asleep during that movie because it was as dull as dishwater.
See also: dishwater, dull

(as) dull as dishwater

Very boring or unexciting. This phrase is often used to describe a person. My date with Dave was not great—he is as dull as dishwater. I fell asleep during that movie because it was as dull as dishwater.
See also: dishwater, dull

deadly dull

Very boring. It seems that Ernie can make any topic deadly dull—he's just doesn't have any personality.
See also: deadly, dull

keep it down to a dull roar

To be quiet or stop making a lot of noise; to maintain a low level of noise. Often used as an imperative. Kids, when you work together, please keep it down to a dull roar.
See also: down, dull, keep, roar

never a dull moment

There is always something happening or changing; things are always busy or chaotic. A: "Wow, it must get pretty hectic having all these young kids running around." B: "Yep, never a dull moment!" I love that there's never a dull moment in this city. I don't think I'd be able to tolerate the silence of the countryside.
See also: dull, moment, never

(as) dull as ditchwater

Very boring or unexciting. This phrase is often used to describe a person. My date with Dave was not great—he is as dull as ditchwater. I fell asleep during that movie because it was as dull as ditchwater.
See also: ditchwater, dull

dull the edge of (something)

To lessen some aspect of something, often so that it is less severe or effective. Likened to dulling the edge of a blade. Unfortunately, there is little we can do to dull the edge of such an emotional issue.
See also: dull, edge, of

a dull roar

A low level of noise. Kids, when you work together, please keep it down to a dull roar.
See also: dull, roar

All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.

Prov. It is not healthy for someone to work all the time and never play. (Often used to exhort someone to stop working, or to justify why you have stopped working. You can substitute the name of the person you are addressing for Jack.) Don't come to the office this weekend. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. I'd like to take a week's vacation next month. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.
See also: all, and, boy, dull, jack, make, no, play, work

deadly dull

very dull. The lecture was deadly dull, and I went to sleep. Her story was really deadly dull. I am sorry I was awake for part of it.
See also: deadly, dull

*dull as dishwater

 and *dull as ditch water
very uninteresting. (*Also: as ~.) I'm not surprised that he can't find a partner. He's as dull as dishwater. Mr. Black's speech was as dull as dishwater.
See also: dishwater, dull

never a dull moment

[it's] always exciting around here. (Describes an exciting or hectic situation.) Every time I visit Jean, she has dozens of things planned for us to do: parties and theaters to attend, restaurants to try, scenic places to see. Never a dull moment. Alan: How was work today? Jane: First of all, my boss called me in to yell at me. Then I had to fire one of my subordinates. And then my desk chair broke when I sat down on it. Never a dull moment.
See also: dull, moment, never

all work and no play (makes Jack a dull boy)

Hard work without time for recreation is not good for one's health, as in If Harry keeps up that grueling schedule, he's headed for a breakdown-all work and no play isn't healthy . A proverb included in James Howell's collection of 1659, this phrase remains so familiar that it is often shortened, as in the example.
See also: all, and, dull, jack, no, play, work

dull as dishwater

Boring, tedious, as in That lecture was dull as dishwater. The original simile, dull as ditchwater, dating from the 1700s, alluded to the muddy water in roadside ditches. In the first half of the 1900s, perhaps through mispronunciation, it became dishwater, that is, the dingy, grayish water in which dirty dishes had soaked.
See also: dishwater, dull

never a dull moment

Something is always changing or happening, as in First Lauren spits up, then she coughs, then she sneezes-never a dull moment with this baby! This expression was first recorded in 1889.
See also: dull, moment, never

dull as ditchwater

or

dull as dishwater

If someone or something is as dull as ditchwater or as dull as dishwater, they are very boring. He's a dull writer and that's a fact. Dull as ditchwater. `Most of the politicians in Ontario are dull as dishwater,' he said. Note: The expression `dull as ditchwater' is over 200 years old, whereas `dull as dishwater' is a more recent variant. The reference is to the dull dirty colour of the water in ditches or in washing-up bowls.
See also: ditchwater, dull

dull as dishwater (or ditchwater)

extremely dull.
See also: dishwater, dull

dull the edge of

make less sensitive, interesting, or effective.
The image here is of making a knife's edge blunt.
See also: dull, edge, of

never a dull moment

used to express the idea of constant (and sometimes perhaps excessive) variety and excitement. informal
See also: dull, moment, never

(as) dull as ˈditchwater

(British English) (American English (as) dull as ˈdishwater) very boring: Best-seller or not, the book sounds as dull as ditchwater to me.
See also: ditchwater, dull

(as) dull as dishwater

mod. very dull. Life can be as dull as dishwater.
See also: dishwater, dull

dull as dishwater

verb
See also: dishwater, dull

deadly (dull)

mod. very dull. The lecture was deadly dull, and I went to sleep.
See also: deadly, dull

dull roar

n. a relatively quiet degree of noisiness. Try to keep it at a dull roar if you can.
See also: dull, roar

dull as dishwater

Flat, boring. This expression began life in the eighteenth century as dull as ditchwater, alluding to the muddy color of the water in roadside gullies. “He’d be sharper than a serpent’s tooth, if he wasn’t as dull as ditchwater,” says Dickens’s Fanny Cleaver (Oliver Twist). This version survived on both sides of the Atlantic well into the twentieth century. Either through careless pronunciation or through similar analogy it occasionally became dishwater—water in which dishes had been washed and which consequently was dingy and grayish.
See also: dishwater, dull

never a dull moment

Something exciting is always occurring. This term, usually stated ironically when something dangerous, stressful, or otherwise unpleasant is happening, became common in the Royal Navy in the 1930s and spread from there across the Atlantic and to civilian situations.
See also: dull, moment, never
References in periodicals archive ?
It further gained 10 paisa as demand from private sector buyers remained dull. The dollar drifted lower at Rs111.50 and Rs111.80.
Bland, in New South Wales, and Boring are both named after early residents of their areas - William Bland and William Boring - and Dull is a Pictish word for field.
Jeremy Corbyn is just not ordinary enough to join the Dull Men's Club.
The towns teamed up in 2012 after a friend of a Dull resident spotted Boring on a cycling trip.
But don't be fooled into thinking there are not many very dull games in Spain and many predictable results.
2 : not shiny or bright <The old trophy had a dull finish.>
"There's no fungicide protection left from ear sprays and the dull days have kept wheats growing for longer.
To determine treatment, an acupuncturist will typically ask about the nature of the pain (dull, sharp, throbbing), where and when headaches tend to occur, and what typically makes them worse or better: cold, heat, exercise, rest, etc.
Some of the finest reporters in the business are dull, dull, dull on camera, speaking in a monotone as they read their copy.
But it was Danny Biasone, owner of the early-NBA Syracuse Nationals, who actually implemented the idea to combat dull, low-scoring, ball-controlling games.
In quantity and in the hands of a crowd of graffitists, they can transform the lower reaches of a dull building--for at least the life of the batteries.
This front-page event was attended by a transfixed mob (including many former Pruitt-lgoe residents) that reportedly let out a dull roar as the buildings fell--and it is this spectacle of collective catharsis, more than the simple fact of the buildings' demise, that drives the drawings and sculptures in Michael Rakowitz's New York solo debut.
* Visible defects on the surface of a molded part appear as dull, glossy, or hazy areas, or as a rippled surface, called orange peel.
The researchers studied youngsters ages six to 17 months at day-care centers, observing how they played with a polished stainless steel plate, a glossy white plastic plate, and teal-colored plastic plates with glossy and dull surfaces.
Department head, Queen's University (in chronological order) Safe Clothing Begone Dull Care Les Raquetteurs Warrendale Wojeck: "The Last Man in the World" The Ballad of Crowfoot Surfacing on the Thames Les Dernieres fiancailles The Grey Fox Da Vinci's Inquest: "Little Sister"