drown

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Related to drowning: Near drowning
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(as) wet as a drowned rat

Soaking wet, especially because of heavy rain. You poor thing, you're wet as a drowned rat! The kids came in from the storm as wet as a bunch of drowned rats. I know we have to walk to the cafeteria even though it's raining, but I hate being wet as a drowned rat for all of our afternoon classes.
See also: drown, rat, wet

a drowning man will clutch at a straw

proverb Someone who is desperate will try to use anything for help, even if it is really no help at all. Facing the possibility that his marriage might be over, John began visiting psychics to help him decide what to do. A drowning man will clutch at a straw. A: "Holistic medicine probably can't help him now that the cancer has spread so drastically, but he still wants to give it a shot." B: "Well, a drowning man will clutch at a straw." Stu's spreading these lies about me because he knows he can't beat me fair and square! It's so typical—a drowning man will clutch at a straw.
See also: clutch, drown, man, straw, will

a drowning man will grab at a straw

proverb Someone who is desperate enough will try anything to help their situation, even if it is really of no help at all. A: "I heard Jared is going to a psychic to help him figure out how to salvage his marriage." B: "Wow. A drowning man will grab at a straw, huh?" A: "Holistic medicine probably can't help him now that the cancer has spread so drastically, but he still wants to give it a shot." B: "Well, a drowning man will grab at a straw." Stu's spreading these lies about me because he knows he can't beat me fair and square! It's so typical—a drowning man will grab at a straw.
See also: drown, grab, man, straw, will

a drowning man will grasp at a straw

proverb Someone who is desperate enough will try anything to help their situation, even if it is really of no help at all. A: "I heard Jared is going to a psychic to help him figure out how to salvage his marriage." B: "Wow. A drowning man will grasp at a straw, huh?" A: "Holistic medicine probably can't help him now that the cancer has spread so drastically, but he still wants to give it a shot." B: "Well, a drowning man will grasp at a straw." Stu's spreading these lies about me because he knows he can't beat me fair and square! It's so typical—a drowning man will grasp at a straw.
See also: drown, grasp, man, straw, will

a straw to a drowning man

1. Something that provides some modicum of hope in an otherwise hopeless situation. We'd exhausted every other treatment option available when a friend suggested a holistic healer from Siberia who had purportedly cured several people of terminal illness. I was skeptical, but it was a straw to a drowning man. Her suggestion that I reboot my frozen computer was a straw to a drowning man, and it worked! I was able to get everything up and running right before my presentation! I know this clinical trial feels like a straw to a drowning man, but don't get too excited. Realistically, patients agree to cancer clinical trials when they have few other options.
2. That which proves utterly useless or inadequate to someone's needs. This government subsidy scheme is laughable. They are offering a $100 rebate for affected businesses, when most of them are going to be tens of thousands of dollars in the red. Talk about a straw to a drowning man. Thanks for the umbrella—it's stuck inside out, so it's about as useful as a straw to a drowning man. Did she seriously only bring us microwavable meals during a power outage? Geez, there's a straw to a drowning man.
See also: drown, man, straw, to

be drowning in (something)

To have more of something than one possibly needs, wants, or can handle. I knew it would be complicated getting a new business off the ground, but I've been drowning in paperwork for weeks! Trust me, he can afford it. His family is positively drowning in money.
See also: drown

drown (one's) sorrow(s)

To attempt to forget one's troubles through the consumption of something, typically alcohol (to which the phrase originally referred). It's not healthy to just drown your sorrows every time a girl breaks up with you. Quit drinking and try to face reality. Whenever I have a hard week at work, I like to spend Friday night drowning my sorrow in pizza and ice cream.
See also: drown

drown (one's) troubles

To attempt to forget one's troubles through the consumption of something, typically alcohol (to which the phrase originally referred). It's not healthy to just drown your troubles every time a girl breaks up with you. Quit drinking and try to face reality. Whenever I have a hard week at work, I like to spend Friday night drowning my troubles in pizza and ice cream.
See also: drown, trouble

drown in (something)

1. Literally, to die from asphyxiation while submerged in a liquid. No one is drowning in the ocean today—not on this lifeguard's watch!
2. To cause oneself, someone, or something die from asphyxiation while submerged in a liquid. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "drown" and "in." Virginia Woolf's writing career came to an end in 1941 when she drowned herself in the River Ouse.
3. To overwhelm someone with an abundance of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "drown" and "in." I don't mean to drown you in paperwork, but I do need all of these documents filed today.
4. To be completely overwhelmed by the abundance of something. I need one of those interns to help me file today because I'm totally drowning in paperwork.
See also: drown

drown in self-pity

To be entirely consumed by sorrow, self-deprecation, or other negative emotions to the point of self-indulgence and/or paralysis. It's hard to help someone who would rather drown in self-pity than find a solution to their problems.
See also: drown

drown out

1. To force someone out of one's home, often due to flooding. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drown" and "out." Unfortunately, that hurricane drowned us out, and we've been staying with relatives ever since.
2. To use or create a louder noise to make a different, often unpleasant, noise less audible. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drown" and "out." I immediately turned up the TV in an attempt to drown out my brother's tuba practice.
See also: drown, out

drown the shamrock

slang To drink alcohol on St. Patrick's Day. Make sure you wear green when we go to drown the shamrock tomorrow night.
See also: drown

if you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned

proverb If someone is destined to die in a particular way, no other type of injury or disaster will kill them. A: "I can't believe Paul's doing so well after getting rescued by the lifeguard." B: "Well, you know what they say—if you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned."
See also: born, drown, if, never, to

like a drowned rat

Soaking wet (and usually dirty and unkempt as well). She came in from the storm looking like a drowned rat. The poor little guy stood shivering on the beach like a drowned rat.
See also: drown, like, rat

look like a drowned rat

To be soaking wet, especially due to heavy rain. You poor thing, you look like a drowned rat! The kids came home looking like a bunch of drowned rats.
See also: drown, like, look, rat
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

drown in something

 
1. . Lit. to be asphyxiated in some liquid. Wouldn't you hate to drown in that nasty, smelly water? lam not choosy about what I don't want to drown in.
2. Fig. to experience an overabundance of something. We are just drowning in cabbage this year. Our garden is full of it. They were drowning in bills, not money to pay them with.
See also: drown

drown one's troubles

 and drown one's sorrows
Fig. to try to forget one's problems by drinking a lot of alcohol. Bill is in the bar, drowning his troubles. Jane is at home, drowning her sorrows.
See also: drown, trouble

drown someone in something

Fig. to inundate someone with something. (See also drown in something.) I will drown you in money and fine clothes. Mike drowned the nightclub singer in fancy jewels and furs.
See also: drown

drown (someone or an animal) in something

to cause someone or an animal to die of asphyxiation in a liquid. He accidentally drowned the cat in the bathtub. She drowned herself in the lake.
See also: drown

drown someone (or an animal) out

[for a flood] to drive someone or an animal away from home. The high waters almost drowned the farmers out last year. The water drowned out the fields.
See also: drown, out

drown someone or something out

[for a sound] to be so loud that someone or something cannot be heard. The noise of the passing train drowned out our conversation. The train drowned us out.
See also: drown, out

A drowning man will clutch at a straw.

Prov. When you are desperate, you will look for anything that might help you, even if it cannot help you very much. Scott thinks this faith healer will cure his baldness. A drowning man will clutch at a straw.
See also: clutch, drown, man, straw, will

If you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned.

Prov. If you escape one disaster, it must be because you are destined for a different kind of disaster. (Sometimes used to warn someone who has escaped drowning against gloating over good luck.) When their ship was trapped in a terrible storm, Ellen told her husband that she feared they would die. "Don't worry," he replied with a yawn, "if you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned."
See also: born, drown, if, never, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drown one's sorrows

Drink liquor to escape one's unhappiness. For example, After the divorce, she took to drowning her sorrows at the local bar. The notion of drowning in drink dates from the late 1300s.
See also: drown, sorrow

drown out

Overwhelm with a louder sound, as in Their cries were drowned out by the passing train. [Early 1600s]
See also: drown, out

like a drowned rat

Also, wet as a drowned rat. Soaking wet and utterly bedraggled, as in When she came in out of the rain she looked like a drowned rat. This simile appeared in Latin nearly 2,000 years ago, and in English about the year 1500.
See also: drown, like, rat
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

look like a drowned rat

If someone looks like a drowned rat, they are very wet, usually because they have been caught in heavy rain. I had no umbrella with me so by the time I got home, I looked like a drowned rat.
See also: drown, like, look, rat

drown your sorrows

If someone drowns their sorrows, they drink a lot of alcohol in order to forget something sad that has happened to them. He was in the pub drowning his sorrows after the break-up of his relationship.
See also: drown, sorrow
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

drown your sorrows

forget your problems by getting drunk.
See also: drown, sorrow

like a drowned rat

extremely wet and bedraggled.
See also: drown, like, rat

drown the shamrock

drink, or go drinking on St Patrick's day.
The shamrock with its three-lobed leaves was said to have been used by St Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, to illustrate the doctrine of the Trinity. It is now used as the national emblem of Ireland.
See also: drown
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

drown your ˈsorrows

(informal, often humorous) try to forget your problems or a disappointment by drinking alcohol: Whenever his team lost a match he could be found in the pub afterwards drowning his sorrows.
See also: drown, sorrow

like a drowned ˈrat

(informal) very wet: She came in from the storm looking like a drowned rat.
See also: drown, like, rat
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

drown out

v.
To muffle or mask some sound with a louder sound: I turned up my TV in order to drown out the noise coming from next door. The protesters drowned the speaker out.
See also: drown, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

drown (one's) sorrow

/sorrows
To try to forget one's troubles by drinking alcohol.
See also: drown, sorrow
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

drowned rat, like a/wet as a

Thoroughly soaked and utterly bedraggled. Despite their frequent presence in sewers and similar wet places, rats do not like water, a fact observed for many centuries (“It rained by the bucket and they came home wet as drowned rats,” Petronius, Satyricon, ca. a.d. 60). See also soaked to the skin.
See also: drown, like, wet
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Drowning was also responsible for one out of every four deaths from any cause for children aged one to four - the age group comprising the majority of drowning deaths - said the report.
2 Pay special attention to needs of children with medical conditions that increase drowning risk, such as seizure disorders, autism spectrum disorder, and cardiac arrhythmias, and advise uninterrupted supervision for these children even in baths.
The Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) singled out the month of April as having the highest average number of deaths (355) caused by drowning and submersion from 2006 to 2013.
The Flying Rescuer is one of the latest innovations added to the Coastal Rescue and Safety System run by the municipality, which has achieved zero "deaths" due to drowning cases since its opening in 2016.
The Dubai Municipality has developed a drone, the 'Flying Rescuer', designed to quickly respond to drowning cases.
Dubai Municipality today unveiled a new drone that can simultaneously rescue a group of people from drowning.
ROP sources said that some drowning incidents take place in swimming pools in residential premises and farm houses, and to prevent these, the pools must be surrounded by minimum 1m high barriers with a door that can be locked.
"It's important for parents to learn how to recognize the signs of secondary and dry drowning so they won't attribute the symptoms associated with these conditions, such as fatigue or a drop in their child's energy level, to a long day of swimming, or exhaustion from a near drowning.
After the drowning incident, rescue personnel reached the site and currently are searching for Usama and Faraz.
According to police, two real brothers identified as Shoieb Ahmed, of 20, an intermediate student, and Tanveer Ahmed, 18, a matriculate student, son of Manzoor Ali by caste Abro, were drowned to death when who were taking bath into Dadu Canal to beat the heath owing to scorching heat while it was also reported that both the brothers had kept fasting and drowned when youngster brother Tanveer Ahmed saw his elder brother Shoieb Ahmed is drowning and tried to rescue him, but unfortunately both the brothers were drowned to death.
Experts believe that implementing preventative strategies in the community and on a national level could significantly reduce the risk of drowning, especially among children.
At the turn of the millennium, drowning was the third leading cause of unintentional injury-related death globally, with an estimated mortality rate of 7.4 per 100 000 population.
KARACHI -- At least 12 people have died by drowning at the Hawks Bay beach in Karachi, rescue sources said Saturday afternoon.
Although Electric Shock Drowning can occur virtually in any location where electricity is provided near water, the majority of Electric Shock Drowning deaths have occurred in public and private marinas and docks.