drown in (something)

(redirected from drown herself in)

drown in (something)

1. Literally, to die from asphyxiation while submerged in a liquid. No one is drowning in the ocean today—not on this lifeguard's watch!
2. To cause oneself, someone, or something die from asphyxiation while submerged in a liquid. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "drown" and "in." Virginia Woolf's writing career came to an end in 1941 when she drowned herself in the River Ouse.
3. To overwhelm someone with an abundance of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "drown" and "in." I don't mean to drown you in paperwork, but I do need all of these documents filed today.
4. To be completely overwhelmed by the abundance of something. I need one of those interns to help me file today because I'm totally drowning in paperwork.
See also: drown

drown (someone or an animal) in something

to cause someone or an animal to die of asphyxiation in a liquid. He accidentally drowned the cat in the bathtub. She drowned herself in the lake.
See also: drown

drown someone in something

Fig. to inundate someone with something. (See also drown in something.) I will drown you in money and fine clothes. Mike drowned the nightclub singer in fancy jewels and furs.
See also: drown

drown in something

 
1. . Lit. to be asphyxiated in some liquid. Wouldn't you hate to drown in that nasty, smelly water? lam not choosy about what I don't want to drown in.
2. Fig. to experience an overabundance of something. We are just drowning in cabbage this year. Our garden is full of it. They were drowning in bills, not money to pay them with.
See also: drown
References in periodicals archive ?
Quethlie Alexis said the star spent 48 hours in a coma after drinking a whole bottle of what she believed to be a sleeping aid and also tried to drown herself in the swimming pool at her Bahamas mansion.
She had told friends in the aftermath that she would drown herself in a river if she ever planned to take her life again but, in the days before her disappearance, had shown no sign of wanting to carry out the threat.
This was ``based on the evidence available and the threat she made a number of years ago to drown herself in a river,'' he said.
The title story, Jessie Redmon Fauset's "The Sleeper Wakes," for instance, provides a neat subversion of the popular "tragic octoroon" tale by painting a heroine who embraces her newly discovered Black heritage rather than following the well-trod, fictional path to drown herself in a swamp or throw herself off a cliff.