dropout


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Related to dropout: dropout voltage

dropout factory

A high school that has an unusually high number of students who leave school (drop out) before graduating. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. With so little funding going to public education these days, it's no wonder that so many schools are becoming dropout factories.
See also: dropout, factory

drop out

1. verb To fall or spill out of something. I didn't realize that I hadn't fully zipped my backpack until my books started dropping out of it.
2. verb To break and/or plunge suddenly. This usage typically refers to the bottom of something. The bottom dropped out of the paper bag once it got wet. If the bottom drops out of the stock market, we could have another Great Depression ahead of us.
3. verb To let someone or something fall or proceed out of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drop" and "out." Drop the troops out of the plane once you're safely over the compound. Of course the boys got into mischief and started dropping each other's things out the window.
4. verb To eliminate or exclude something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drop" and "out." Something is wrong with the sound system because it's dropping out every third word.
5. verb To be eliminated. Something is wrong with the sound system because every third word is dropping out.
6. verb To abandon society and conventional values, as due to disillusionment with them. After surviving a serious illness, my sister dropped out and bought a house in the country instead of going back to her corporate job.
7. verb To leave an activity or program without finishing it. I'm going back to school because I always regretted dropping out of college.
8. noun One who has left school before graduation. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. I'm going back to school because I always regretted being a college dropout.
See also: drop, out

drop out

 (of something)
1. . Lit. to fall out of something. One by one, the skydivers dropped out of the plane. The marshmallows dropped out of the bag.
2. Lit. or Fig. [for the bottom of something] to break loose and drop. The bottom dropped out of the box, spilling everything everywhere. The bottom dropped out of the stock market, and we lost a lot of money.
3. Fig. [for someone] to resign from or cease being a member of something; [for someone] to leave school. Sally dropped out of school for some unknown reason. But why did she drop out?
See also: drop, out

drop out

Withdraw from participation in a group such as a school, club, or game; also, withdraw from society owing to disillusionment. For example, He couldn't afford the membership dues and had to drop out, or She planned to drop out from college for a year. [Late 1800s]
See also: drop, out

drop out

v.
1. To fall out of something: My card must have dropped out of the bag at some point.
2. To make or let something or someone fall out of something: I dropped the stones out of the window.
3. To withdraw from participation in something, as a game, club, or school: The committee is trying to determine why so many students were dropping out. I dropped out of algebra because it was too hard. I dropped history out of my schedule this term.
4. To withdraw from established society, especially due to disillusionment with conventional values: My cousin dropped out and moved to the tropics.
5. To omit something: This computer drops out the semicolons. The old stereo drops the bass out.
6. To be omitted: When words are contracted, some sounds or letters drop out.
See also: drop, out

drop out

1. in. to withdraw from a conventional lifestyle. Sometimes I just want to drop out and raise pigs or something.
2. in. to drop out of school or some organization. Don’t drop out of school. You’ll regret it.
3. and dropout n. someone who has dropped out of school. Dropouts may find it very hard to get a job.
See also: drop, out

dropout

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Career academies address the root cause of the dropout issue, and this is necessary to obtain the savings and reductions in crime.
Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, has filed legislation that adjusts the way the state measures dropout and completion rates for charters that serve at-risk students.
In that time, he has seen the dropout rate at the high school almost cut in half, from 6.
Many could not and had to report higher dropout rates.
Himself an advocate for improving the dropout problem, Hinojosa introduced with Davis the Graduation for All bill, which asks for up to $1 billion to improve adolescent literacy for at-risk sixth- through 12th-graders.
Kennedy, potential dropouts, aka "early school leavers," will therefore be motivated to stay in school, if only to get their licenses.
Among those states for which CCD dropout data are available, event dropout rates for public high school students ranged from 2.
So, engineers must interpolate data to determine the dropout voltage for a given output current.
5 percent dropout rate in 2003-04 is a statistical blip.
They've cooked the books: they've tolerated or even encouraged high-risk students to drop out while failing to keep tabs on the dropouts.
Problems arise in obtaining accurate information of cohort dropout rates because students move, change schools for other reasons (e.
Sherman Dorn's Creating the Dropout successfully undermines a number of myths about the "dropout problem" in America.
We included in our analyses information on whether an individual obtained each type of training for each year from date of dropout through 1991.
Based on data from the California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS), the study conducted by the California Dropout Research Project (CDRP) shows that just 100 high schools--out of 2,462 high schools in California--account for more than 40 percent of the state's dropouts.
ERIC Descriptors: Public Schools; Dropouts; High School Graduates; Graduation Rate; Enrollment; Dropout Rate; Grade 9; Grade 10; Grade 11; Grade 12; Asian American Students; White Students; African American Students; American Indian Students; Racial Differences; Gender Differences; High School Freshmen